Posts Tagged miniature gardens

Miniature Fairy Gardening : What They Won’t Tell You But I Will

TruthAboutMoss 1

Miniature Fairy Gardening : What They Won’t Tell You But I Will

Ugh. It’s a pet peeve of mine. I should be a consumer advocate. I just hate seeing people set up for failure – especially in our beloved miniature garden niche.

A customer emailed the other day and complained that her moss smelled musty. After a bit of digging, pun intended, I Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvofound out she used the new moss “sheets” to cover the ground in and around her plants. The moss was getting moldy because of the dampness of the soil in the living garden. Unfortunately, she was sold artificial moss for that specific purpose: to “grow” it in her fairy garden.

Ugh x 2. Really?

The fairy garden moss that is out on the market today will not work with live plants nor will it grow. It’s fake and should be used only for artificial scenes. It will suffocate and kill the soil, and any roots if it is used with real plants too. (Soil is alive, dirt is dead – but that is another blog post, right here.)

THIS includes any kind of preserved moss, moss sheets, moss clumps, Spanish moss, reindeer moss, whatever you want to call it. It will NOT grow in a living miniature nor any fairy garden.

And the funniest thing about this is: it’s expensive!

Ugh x 3!!

The Truth About Fairy Moss

Fake moss can’t replace the real thing. It will get musty and moldy in a real garden environment. Fake moss is at the top, the real moss is below on the left in sheet form, and in clumps on the right. Both live-moss samples we find on our property here in Seattle.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE.

AND THEN, I see videos of “professional designers” laying the moss sheets right on the soil! The “designer” then tucks the odd (living) plant in here and there, right into the fake moss! I wonder if she can hear me yelling at her from my desk in Seattle. Lol! Poor plants. That’s just not going to work out well at all. That silly moss will become a nice moldy mess because of the dampness of the living garden, and it will fade to brown quickly in the sun too.

Quick Moss Primer:

What is it then? These are my definitions of the different kinds of craft mosses. I’m 98% sure I have it correct but, they do such crazy stuff in the craft-supply world and in the gift industry, I’m leaving a small margin of error.

Reindeer Moss – Is really a lichen. It was alive at one point, but needs to be killed and preserved to sit on the big-box-store shelves. It comes in dark green, chartreuse green and shades of brown.

Moss Sheets – A certain kind of moss was killed and treated and glued to a plastic mesh, or burlap. It is perfectly dead too. There are “moss sheets” packs that aren’t glued down as well, that can be ripped into tinier pieces for your artificial garden projects.

Mood Moss – An anomaly. Lol! I don’t know what it is made of but it is not moss. And, what made it moody? It didn’t get a seat on the bus this morning on the way to work? It didn’t have a date for Friday night? :o)

Spanish Moss – It’s not a moss either, it’s a bromeliad, Tillandsia usneoides. If you are plucking this off the trees down in the southern states, put it in the microwave for about 30 seconds to de-bug it. The Spanish Moss you find in stores is preserved and very dead too.

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Living Moss Rules: 

  • If you want moss in your living miniature garden, stick with real moss. 
  • If you want moss, you need the correct environment for it to grow it in which is difficult to replicate if it doesn’t happen naturally.
  • If you want moss to grow on rocks, you need to find moss that grows on rocks or pavement.
  • If you want moss to grow on the soil, you need to find moss that grows on the soil.
  • Moss needs light and water too.
  • DIGGING & HARVESTING MOSS FROM PUBLIC LANDS AND FORESTS IS VERY, VERY WRONG. Natural-growing moss is part of the eco-system and if you take away one part of the system, the other parts will suffer and/or fail. Please harvest responsibly or… 

Here are Some Real Moss Resources:

Here is our moss guru, the indelible David Spain with his great (and funny!) website on everything mossy: https://www.mossandstonegardens.com/

Here is our moss for sale that we cultivate here on our property, 3 different types (or stages) of growth. Only available in the winter months. Moss does go dormant in the dry, summer months so if you’re searching for our moss in the dormant months, please come back later! :o)

And leave that fake moss for your other crafty projects! Make a purse or hat for Mom’s Day, or a tie for Father’s Day.

Like this? Want to know more about miniature and fairy gardening from people who will tell you straight? Join us here for your weekly Mini Garden Gazette Newsletter!

The Truth About Fairy Moss

You can tell it is fake by looking at the backside. If it is not soil – it is fake.

Miniature Garden Plants is Our Specialty!

The Truth About Fairy Moss

Not convinced yet? Steve thought it was dried moss until I showed him the inside. Rip it open and you’ll see the fibers.

Sophisticated Fairy Gardening, by Janit Calvo

Our new eBook raises the bar on fairy gardening. Get your copy today, click the picture to go to our online store!

Your Miniature Garden Center

 

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I’m Taking You With Me – Your Miniature Garden Cub Reporter

I’m Taking You With Me – Your Miniature Garden Cub Reporter

Well, well, well!! It’s about time, isn’t it? We’ve been so busy building the new MiniatureGardenSociety.org website for the last two years that it feels really, really good to finally be doing the things I wanted to do with YOU!

Because I’m taking you with me! Yay!

Join me on a winter tour of our favorite wholesale wholesale nursery today. It’s this type of insight that I’m bringing to my new Miniature Garden Society so you can learn about, see more of and experience your miniature garden hobby in ways that you never thought of before: through the eyes of the person who brought it to the marketplace AND wrote the bestselling & most informative on it. (Whew! :o)

Our members can look forward to coming with me on a tour of the second largest garden show in the nation next month, a mecca of miniatures in April – the largest in the States AND you’re coming with me to the huge Epcot Garden Festival at Disney World where I’m presenting my new book, The Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop: Handmade Accessories for Your Tiny Living World by Timber Press (An affiliate Amazon link.)

SO JOIN US!! It’s all happening inside the MiniatureGardenSociety.org!

Miniature Garden Gift Ideas from Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center!

Here’s the script to the video:

I’m brought you with me today! I’m Janit Calvo, founder of the Miniature Garden Society and your new cub reporter for everything miniature garden. This is the type of insight and info-tainment that I’ll be bringing you this year through the Miniature Garden Society. Yep – I’m bringing you with me wherever I go!

Today, we are here at our favorite wholesale nursery just outside of Seattle, Washington. It’s a frigid January day in the Pacific Northwest and our gardens have been frozen for the last 2 weeks. Luckily, we specialize in cold hardy plants for the miniature garden and our plants are definitely hardier than I am!

So this wholesale nursery specializes in all types of perennials and this is where we get our miniature garden bedding plants – okay they are ground covers but isn’t it more fun to call them miniature garden bedding plants?

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.comI’ll bring you back here in the summer because you can’t see just how pretty all the plants look right now – they cover the rows up every winter to give the plants some protection from the often-unpredictable pacific northwest weather.

Some days the sun will warm the plant material up only to dip down to freezing at night. By covering up the plants, it evens-out the temperature and the plants don’t get subjected to that extreme difference each day. It’s just an extra step that this nursery takes to make sure their plant material is high quality all the time.

Another reason they cover them up  plants (or keep them in a heated greenhouse) is to speed up the growing process so they can sell plants faster but they do make sure they harden-off the plant and actually put the plant through two stages to make sure it hardy enough for the outdoor weather.

You can see all the greenhouses that line the fields – there are about 97 of them here. All but a few of them are unheated. But look at the rows and rows of plants. It’s a dangerous place to be if you are a plant-aholic! We’re back here in the corner sourcing some lavender for a customer so this is the view looking back from where we came. In the summer all those fields are full of flowering perennials and it’s just lovely.

Join us at the MiniatureGardenSociety.org for more insight and fun with your miniature garden hobby. This spring I’ll be taking you to the second biggest garden show in the country, I’m taking you to the miniature mecca that happens in the United States each year AND – we’re all going to Disney! Yes, I’m taking you to the Epcot Garden Festival where I’m doing a presentation on my latest book, The Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop: Handmade Accessories for your Tiny Living World!

So join us – you’ve got your hobby, now here is your club: MiniatureGardenSociety.org!

 

Gardening in Miniature, now in it's 5th printing!

We wrote the book on it. Get your autographed copy here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Easy, Quick & Fun: A Miniature Garden Pumpkin House

Halloween Miniature Garden

Once the pumpkin house was carved, it was easy fun setting up this shot in the miniature garden.

Easy, Quick & Fun: A REAL Miniature Garden Pumpkin House PLUS Halloween Tips

After years of creating and growing with this new-again hobby of miniature gardening, it’s a wonder that you can come up with anything new, huh? But, alas, it’s the variables that rope you in and keep the ideas dancing in your head in the wee hours of the morning. So many plants, pots, accessories, sizes, themes and designs to keep you creative! Oh my!

You mean I can plant a garden now? – ‘Tis the season and you can start with Halloween, carry on through Thanksgiving and into the holidays with the same garden – or make a new one each month. Miniature gardening is season-less and can be done anytime, anywhere, so don’t wait for the seasons to have a reason to gardening in miniature!

Make a REAL Miniature Pumpkin House! – Alright, there are now two ways to go about getting a miniature pumpkin house in your miniature garden. This pumpkin-house blog was first published 3 years ago and, since then, a few different kinds of resin pumpkin fairy houses have been made in China and brought back here to attempt to tempt you with… if you can be temped by future landfill. (Sorry, I’m a tree-hugger and very pro-Earth.) BUT you’ll never get the satisfaction out of a resin house that you will from carving your own house design from a real pumpkin. So, release your inner architect, grab a knife and pumpkin and have some fun. I sure your fairies will enjoy a real pumpkin house too!

Halloween Miniature Garden

We tried shooting with some extra light off to the side, but found them a bit distracting from the pumpkin house. We found the light-up ghost for $1.99 at Rite Aid.

Tips for Shooting Photos in the Dark:

  • Set up your shot in the daylight and start shooting when it’s dusk. If it gets too dark, the camera can’t see the plants with the natural light and you can’t see the surroundings. Photoshopping it afterwards doesn’t look natural.
  • Use a tripod or something sturdy to hold the camera in place. The camera’s shutter will need to stay open for a few seconds, by keeping the camera steady, it will stay focused.
  • Try a couple of different settings on your camera. If you have automatic “scene” settings, try the food and/or museum settings first. Turn the flash off if the camera sets it off automatically. If you are tinkering with manual settings, try adjusting the exposure compensation to a brighter setting.

http://www.MiniatureGardenSociety.com

  • Load your photos to your computer from your camera before you take the scene apart. Seeing the images on a bigger screen gives you another perspective and you can see what needs tweaking, fix it and reshoot it right away.
  • Be prepared to work fast, as soon as that sun sets you have a limited amount of time to use that dwindling light. If you can, do it again the following night. If you’re an early bird, try this at dawn but set up the shot the day before when you can see, have the candles ready to light and have a piece of cardboard or plastic to sit, kneel or lay down on.
  • Have something else that lights up in the shot. That little light-up ghost helped to illuminate some more details outside the pumpkin house. If you have string lights, see how they look just laid behind the house, or in front of the house and the edge of the shot.
Halloween Miniature Garden

I cut the squares for windows, then sliced up the cast-off pieces to make the “window panes” and just wedged them in place. The pieces will dry out and shrink so either keep some extra pieces cold and damp to replace the strips when needed. If they dry out too much, get the hot glue gun to tack them in place from the inside. (Assuming the inside flesh of the pumpkin has dried out as well. Remember that it’s only temporary.)

Miniature Garden Clean-Up Tip: For your Halloween set-up, leave the fallen leaves scattered around the miniature garden. It will look more natural. Don’t worry about detailing the garden if your photographing in the dark, the focus will be whatever is lit up. In this example, the eye will go to the pumpkin house first, the ghost second, and then take in the rest of the scene.

Miniature Halloween pumpkin house

The impromptu patio was taken out of a miniature garden and reused here. It’s made from our Mini Patio Mix Kit, a special recipe just for miniature gardens. You can customize to fit any garden and won’t wash away in the rain.

Have a happy and safe Halloween! 

In case you missed it:

How to Carve a Miniature Pumpkin

Halloween in the Miniature Garden

Our main website with galleries and FAQs

Our online store, The Miniature Garden Center

Like this? Then you’ll love our FREE Mini Garden Gazette! Join us here.

Miniature Garden Trees

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Round-Up: More About Miniature Garden Plants

Miniature Gardening at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show

Some of the plants used for our Northwest Flower and Garden Show display were chosen as experiments to see how fast they grow up. The Parahebe, the small plant in front of the big Hinoki tree in the front blue pot, ‘looked’ like a good possibility – until it grew up.

Round-Up: More About Miniature Garden Plants

I STILL do it!

I always fall for the cutest little plants, especially when they are in flower. I buy it, plant it and watch it grow – and grow and grow and grow! So not cool if you are a miniature gardener.

So. Not. Cool. If your the world renown expert on miniature gardening either. Thankfully you have me to make these mistakes for you!

;o)

After all, we ARE looking from them to stay small or grow really slowly.

I’m getting a lot of emails lately asking about what kind of plants to use for miniature gardening – or how to find out what works in your backyard and what doesn’t. So I put this mini-directory together of previous blogs that have touched upon the subject in various ways. If your question isn’t answered here, please do let me know.

How to Find the Plants

This is part four of our beginner series. You’ll find the links to the rest of the series in the post. These are the steps to take for indoor and outdoor plants:

https://minigardener.wordpress.com/2012/05/16/miniature-gardening-104-how-to-find-the-plants/

Examples of What to Look For

The main points of what to look for with a few examples of plants that we like:

https://minigardener.wordpress.com/2013/04/11/miniature-garden-plants-examples-of-what-to-look-for/

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Secrets to Success

In this post, I talk about some of the plants that trick us into thinking they would work – until they grow up:

https://minigardener.wordpress.com/2012/03/14/miniature-garden-plants-secrets-to-success/

About the Plants Behind the Winning Gardens

From our annual Miniature Garden Contest – I break down the plants that each winner used in their miniature gardens:

https://minigardener.wordpress.com/2012/11/08/an-inside-peak-at-the-miniature-plants-in-the-award-winning-gardens/

The Meaning of “Dwarf” and “Miniature”

Dwarf and miniature are often used in the names of plants to help sell them – which can be misleading. Here are the definitions and what we mean by “dwarf” and “miniature:”

https://minigardener.wordpress.com/2010/03/25/miniature-dwarf-plants-the-true-meaning/

Signs of the Plant’s Demise So You Can Prevent It

A discussion on the signals that plants give you when they are not happy. Notice the signs, save the plant.

https://minigardener.wordpress.com/2010/02/16/how-plants-die/

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

NWFGS miniature garden container

Four months later: the Parahebe sure has pretty flowers – that have overgrown the scale of the miniature garden! I’ll transfer it to one of my in-ground miniature gardens in the fall.

What Can be Grown in your Area?

The very best way to get to know what plants work in your area is your local garden center or nursery – NOT a big box store. You know, one of those cozy, plant-laden stores where you hear a soothing fountain off in the corner, the air is thick with humidity and you have to duck under trees and walk over the hose to get to the cashier – and this is inside the building – THAT kind garden center.

Take some time and walk around and get a feel for where they have the plants at the nursery.  You should find the right plants in the right place too. Note the zone info and what kind of soil they recommend for the plant (and use NO potting soil with added fertilizers!) Then you can retreat home and look again at the space that you are thinking for your miniature garden if you haven’t decided that yet.

Find the tested, tried and true miniature garden trees, shrubs and plants here, up in our online store. We have the best shipping methods and we ship safely all year long!

Here’s a quick-list of what you are looking for:

  • Miniature or slow-growing dwarf trees or shrubs
  • Groundcovers
  • Rockery Plants
  • Alpine Plants
  • Sedums & Succulents (small leafed, of course)

For a complete discussion of the trees, shrubs and plants for miniature gardening, look forward to the first comprehensive book on miniature gardening from Timber Press:

Gardening in Miniature

Now available for through Amazon.com, or wherever books are sold. To order your signed-by-the-author copy, from our online store, click here

Join us for more fun in the miniature garden and sign up for our FREE weekly Mini Garden Gazette newsletter. You’ll get a free PDF, The Best of the Mini Garden Gazette delivered straight to your inbox after you confirm your subscription through your email. Join us here.

 

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Effortless Growing With Proven Miniature Garden Plants

The mighty Tansu Japanese Cedar - or Cryptomeria japonica 'Tansu' - is a real charmer for the miniature garden. Provide evenly damp soil in a part shade/part sun spot and this little guy will constantly delight. Bronzes in winter. See the new 'Twinkle Toes' variety, now up in the store! The bench is about 1 1/2" tall.

The mighty Tansu Japanese Cedar – or Cryptomeria japonica ‘Tansu’ – is a real charmer for the miniature garden. Shown here, it’s about 18 years old, (they are 3 to 4 years old when we get them.) Provide evenly damp soil in a part shade/part sun spot and this little guy will constantly delight. Bronzes in winter. See below for the new ‘Twinkle Toes’ variety, now up in the store that grows even slower. The bench is about 1 1/2″ tall. That mat of ground cover below the tree is Platt’s Black Brass Buttons.

Effortless Growing With Proven Miniature Garden Plants

It’s time to show off some of the miniature garden trees and shrubs that have been growing in our miniature gardens. We are in Seattle, Zone 7, with very temperate winters with the occasional freezing. We use to have cooler summers, but last summer was the hottest/driest on record with high temperatures that lasted for months. Our miniature garden trees and shrubs came through like champions.

There is still plenty of time to get everything in the ground in your miniature garden before summer. Click into the photos or the links for more information on zones, care and maintenance for any of the plants. From the photo above, see the Tansu here. See the NEW Twinkle Toes here. See the Platt’s Black Brass Buttons here.

Stay tuned for more next week, there were too many miniature plants to include in just one post! Note that most of the plants shown in this blog post are outdoor plants. See our indoor options here.

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Oooh! I love how the camera picked up the rimmed branches of this old Nana Hinoki Cypress! The Hinoki’s are a favorite for the miniature garden, they come in all shapes, sizes and colors and they never disappoint. That is Dwarf Mondo Grass to the left and Miniature London Pride to the right of it beside the stone.

See all the Hinoki Cypress here. See the Dwarf Mondo Grass here and the Miniature London Pride here.

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The Fernspray Gold Hinoki Cypress is one of our faves. It turns greener in the part sun and bright gold in full sun. In winter it turns all sorts of ambers and purple if it’s cold enough. The branches can be trimmed to stay bushy, or let them flay-out to form a canopy. Miniature Daisies are at the base of the trunk.

See the Fernspray Gold Hinoki Cypress here. See the Miniature Daisies here.

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The is what the Fernspray Gold Hinoki looks like when you first get them. They all have a wee trunk underneath, trim away the lower branches to raise the canopy and make it more tree-like.

See the Fernspray Gold Hinoki Cypress here.

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Tiny cones are developing on the ends of an older Fernspray Cypress. These tiny cones may mature into teenie cypress cones (cute alert!) or they may slough off. Either way, it’s fun and interesting to watch these little plants grow up from being little baby plants to “big” trees in the miniature garden.

See the Fernspray Gold Hinoki Cypress here.

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This is an untrimmed Hinoki Cypress that has been left to grow on its own. I’ll go back into it and clean up some of the leggier branches to simplify the silhouette a bit. The tree is about 15 years old, the miniature garden is about 10 years old.

See all the Hinoki Cypress here.

Miniature Plants from Two Green Thumbs.com

Isn’t she lovely? Do you call your trees she or he? Lol! I’m smitten with the color of this new Cryptomeria japonica ‘Twinkle Toes!’ I suspect that it it grows similarly to the Tansu Japanese Cedar, but the flecks of yellow throughout the foliage twinkle in the sun, and it grows even slower, at 1″ to 3″ per year.

See the NEW Twinkle Toes here.

Miniature Plants from Two Green Thumbs.com

The limey-green foliage looks really delicate but it’s a very sturdy tree. The color turns bronze in the winter for more seasonal interest when you need it most.

See the Twinkle Toes Japanese Cedar here.

Like this? Want be the first to know of any new trees, plants and accessories that we find? Join us for your weekly dose of miniature gardening and get your Mini Garden Gazette delivered straight to your inbox! Join us here.

Been there, done that? Want to dig deeper into the hobby with a bunch of like-minded miniature gardeners from all over the world? We’re meeting at the NEW Miniature Garden Society members-only website. Find out more about what we are doing here.

 

http://twogreenthumbs.com/Miniature_Garden_Society.html

 

Miniature Gardening with TwoGreenThumbs.com

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Miniature & Fairy Gardeners: Enjoy A Cyber Monday Sale All Week Long!

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Miniature & Fairy Gardeners:
Enjoy A Cyber Monday Sale All Week Long
From Your Miniature Garden Center Store:
TwoGreenThumbs.com !

True miniature plants and trees, realistic and durable mini accessories, kits of all shapes and sizes and much, much more. Only from TwoGreenThumbs.com, your favorite miniature garden center!

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A Sweet Lil’ DIY for Fall in the Miniature Garden

 

Mini DIY for fall for your Mini Garden or Fairy Garden!

A Sweet Lil’ DIY for Fall in the Miniature Garden

OMG! It’s going to be sunny and dry for the next four days! Yippee! Okay, maybe I’ll let the miniature garden dry out for two days and then book the weekend for gardening. See what we have to do here the Pacific Northwest? We need to make dates with our garden and hope the weather cooperates. Working soil when it’s wet will destroy all the little micro stuff in the soil and it’ll become dirt. So, we wait. And hope. And make miniatures. Lol!

But before I clean up all the leaves in the mini garden, let’s do a Thanksgiving Day DIY! This one came from a combination of craft projects found on Melissa’s The Empress of Dirt blog and Patti’s Garden Matter blog. Both blogs are very popular and filled with a ton (and that’s not a joke – really, how do they do it all?) home and garden DIYs, creative decorating ideas, yummy recipes and just about everything handmade. They make me want to quit my day job and play all day.

 

Thanksgiving DIY for the Mini Garden from TwoGreenThumbs.com!

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I took Melissa’s Falling Leaf Project but preserved and mounted the leaves like Patti’s Leaf Garland Project and I came up with a Miniature Leaf Chandelier. It was so fun and easy to do and I’ll think you’ll get the idea when you see the photo and the ingredients!

 

Thanksgiving DIY for the Mini Garden from TwoGreenThumbs.com!

You’ll need:

– The smallest leaves you can find in bright colors
Modge Podge (I use the outdoor one.)
Paintbrush
– Wire, optional 2 sizes, thick & thin
– Ribbon
Wire snips
Flat-nosed pliers
– Scissors
– Hot glue gun with glue

 

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Thanksgiving DIY for the Mini Garden from TwoGreenThumbs.com!

These are from full-sized trees. I just looked a bit harder for the small ones.

 

Preserve the leaf: I preserved the leaves with Outdoor Modge Podge and it helped painting one side of the leaf at a time and letting it dry instead of trying to do the whole leaf at once. Use a piece of plastic or waxed paper to paint on and they won’t stick.

Get wired: I choose that fun green wire because its easy to bend and I wanted the green to show through for a extra splash of color, but you can easily cover the wire with more leaves. Use flat-nosed pliers so you don’t leave a ding-mark (a technical term) in the soft wire.

Tie it off: Tie the ribbon on before you start gluing so you can hide it with the leaves. Instead of the ribbon, you can use invisible thread or fishing line to create a floating chandelier.

Glue it to it: And I used hot-glue to put on the leaves. I don’t plan on leaving this outside so I wasn’t worried about weatherproofing it.

More to make: Find our previous Thanksgiving DIYs here. You can make garden stake and a miniature cornucopia for your mini Thanksgiving table!

 

Thanksgiving DIY for the Mini Garden from TwoGreenThumbs.com!

1. Irish moss 2. Pieris japonica ‘Little Heath’ 3. Nana Hinoki Cypress 4. Euonymous microphylla 5. Elf Dwarf Spruce 6. Variegated Euonymous microphylla. Click the picture to see the plants in our online store sorted by light or by zone. Not all plants are available at all times.

 

Find the unusual: See pretty red chair, custom painted right here in our studios here. And the wee pot with the Sedum cuttings here.

Like this? Serious about miniature gardening? Want to follow the leaders of the hobby? Join us here to get our new weekly Mini Garden Gazette delivered straight to your inbox every Friday.

 

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