Posts Tagged Humour

Tired of Winter? Tired of Politics? Have NO FEAR…

Miniature Garden Society - the best website for Miniature Gardening on the Planet!

Miniature Garden Society – the best website for Miniature Gardening on the Planet!

Tired of Winter? Tired of Politics? Have NO FEAR…

…Your Miniature Gardeners are HERE!

Ugh. That silly groundhog called for SIX more weeks of winter…

Okay, you’re going to have to envision my green cape with my miniature garden logo flapping behind me in the breeze okay? With a green leotard, a mini skirt and really cute boots… can you picture it in your mind? Good. Nice boots, huh? Lol! Here’s what I have for you:

  • A website full of original content on your favorite topic of miniature gardening that is growing and evolving constantly.
  • A place to connect to people that do the same thing you do.
  • A website where there is always something growing.
  • A place for you to ask any question about miniature gardening, plants or accessories.
  • A website where you can find a yummy project for the afternoon, or for the long weekend.
  • A safe place for you to go on the internet that is free of flashing ads, videos that play at random, or ads that have tracked your latest search.

But wait. There’s more.

How about a website that shows you how you can make money doing what you love to do?

I’ve been working on this website for over 2 years now but it feels like I’ve only just started because there is still a TON of information that I have to put up in this unique website.

More projects, insight, how-to’s, upcoming show reviews, interviews and reviews of everything miniature garden! PLUS – I have a super-exciting secret that I’m ONLY sharing here, on this intro page to the Miniature Garden Society Website. You’ll have to click-in to find it out. (Promotion period for this has ended.)

:o)

 

Miniature Garden Society - the best website for Miniature Gardening on the Planet!

The Miniature Garden Society website includes – and will include – exclusive reviews, previews, interviews and news! Fun and informative! Click the picture to find out more. ;o)

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Faith, Hope and Pixie Dust: Miniature Gardening with Disney

faithhope

Faith, Hope and Pixie Dust: Miniature Gardening with Disney

[Updated from November, 2010.] A trip to the toy store the other day to lurk for miniature garden ideas instigated a trip to the video store to rent the latest fairy movie from Disney, Tinkerbell and the Great Fairy Rescue. It’s all in a day’s work here at America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center.

You bet I watched it  – and no, I don’t have children, nor do I have a child in my life that I could borrow for the excuse to watch it. I just did.

Oh, you’re doing it again, aren’t you? You’re laughing at me!

Now this is the kind of invaluable market research that is part of my job as leader of the hobby, researcher of everything mini garden and owner of the world’s only Miniature Garden Center dedicated to gardening in miniature. It’s this is the level of sacrifice

;o)

Nah, really, I just wanted to see if there were any cute ideas I can share and, never-to-be-disappointed-by-Disney, there were more than a few new ideas that you can put in your bag of tricks the next time the kids or grand kids want to get miniature gardening.

Miniature Fairy Garden

Get the kid’s imaginations working with some hands-on fairy fun and magic in the miniature garden.

Fairy Origins and Lore via Disney

– Each time a baby laughs for the very first time, a fairy is born. This is called their Arrival Day, similar to our Birthdays. Wait. Did I hear a giggle?

Disney latest line of fairy toys can easily be used in the miniature garden.

Disney latest line of fairy toys can easily be used in the miniature garden.

– Fairies are from Pixie Hollow and each fairy has a different purpose. They come to the “mainland” to help with the change of the seasons by coloring the flowers in the spring, they help pollinate and tend to the gardens and crops in the summertime, paint the leaves in the fall and make icicles and snowflakes in the winter. Just place what they do before the word fairy and you can create any character for your own purpose. Examples include, “Wind Fairy, Pumpkin Fairy, Dog Fairy, Spruce Fairy, etc.

– Fairies are about 5” tall and are dressed in anything natural that usually illustrate their purpose. Flower fairies wear petals and leaves, the pumpkin fairies wear the pumpkin and the wind fairies… huh? Wait. Are they naked? Lol!

– The fairies help to put the hibernating animals to sleep in the fall or to wake them up in the spring. I wish they could do that for me when I can’t sleep at night. Oh, and they also take care of wounded animals everywhere.

– They paint the stripes on bumblebees and design the patterns on butterflies. Awesome.

– They use fireflies as flashlights. When you see a firefly, it is really fairy flying around.

– Male fairies are called Sparrowmen. They look like elves with wings and acorn hats. I love that name!

A pretty fairy in the mini garden.

A pretty fairy in the mini garden.

Points of Attraction

– Fairies love shiny objects just like me. Place a small mirror or something shiny in the garden to attract them – or me. Lol!

– They sometime use buttons as stepping-stones to lead the fairies to your fairy house. If you do use buttons, please don’t relay on your fairy to keep them in place. Instead, use our Mini Patio Mix Kit. It’s easy and fun to use.

– Create a wee leaf-plate for the “fairy offering” to help lure them into your garden. Fairies eat fruit, vegetables, seeds, nuts and bread. Place a wee snack as an offering and see if they take you up on it.

– Fairies smell slightly like cinnamon. If you catch a whiff, there is a fairy nearby but not the fairies are still not edible.

– They use mint leaves as a toothbrush and pine needle combs. They use cotton balls as pillows and leaves as blankets. Fairies prefer the natural house and lean-to’s so they can go inside and see out the windows.

If you are NOT going to see the movie, here’s a synopsis:

The mAd-Fairyovie was very fun in typical Disney fashion. The only characters are the Dad, the daughter and the fairies. The Dad is very pre-occupied with his work collecting, studying and mounting bugs and butterflies, which is completely horrific for a fairy to see! The daughter catches a fairy by accident (Tinkerbell) and they bond. Dad eventually finds out, catches a fairy and rushes to expose his find to the world. Just before it is too late, he is swayed when he sees his daughter flying with the fairies, pleading for the release of her friend. The fairies befriend the Dad and, with a heavy dose of pixie dust, make him fly too. I love the end where the Dad, daughter and all the fairies are all hanging out spending quality time together.

Checkout your local toy store for a number of different fairy figures to use in the miniature garden that are child-safe, washable and durable. Introduce fun and magic to the children while you still can.

Sign up to be on my mailing list to stay inspired here.

Like this? Please visit the Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center here. We appreciate your support to keep us going and we specialize in superior, personalized customer service!

See more:
Whimsical Fairy Swing DIY
About Miniature Fairy Garden Moss
Declutter Your Fairy Garden 

Checkout Disney’s wonderfully Interactive Pixie Hollow Website here.

Sophisticated Fairy Gardening, by Janit Calvo

NEW LOW PRICE!! Click the Picture to read the intro! An expert view on fairy gardening and how to make them look authentic in your miniature garden.

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How to Make a Miniature Stonehenge Garden

Miniature Stonehenge Garden

Our Miniature Stonehenge Garden photo has been making the rounds on the Internet and shared by thousands on Facebook and Pinterest. Here’s a little How-to so you can make your own!

How to Make a Miniature Stonehenge Garden for the Solstice

[From December 21, 2012] Dang. It’s the end of the world and I was supposed to take my credit cards on a wild vacation! Well, maybe next time… ;o)

 Miniature Garden Display

The Miniature Garden Display from the Northwest Flower and Garden Show, 2007, where the Miniature Stonehenge picture was taken.

Speaking of a wild trip, the little photo (above) has had quite a journey over the past month thanks to our friend Nancy Wisser over at the Clonehenge blog, and to thousands of shares through Facebook and Pinterest. We’ve been swamped with emails asking where to get it and how to do it so we got a how-to together for you here, in honor of the End of Days.

The Miniature Stonehenge Garden was from our display at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show in 2007. The display was called ‘Miniature Gardener Interrupted’ and while it wasn’t our strongest display, it sure was fun to make a mess and leave it there for the entire show. (Yes, the irreverent artist inside me still rises up at times. Such rebelliousness. ;o)

Miniature Garden Ebook

How to Make a Miniature Stonehenge Garden

Hover over the photos for the captions:

We found the miniature Stonehenge Kit at a Barnes and Noble store, call ahead if your going to one of the brick and Janit's Mini Garden Etsy Storemortar stores, they may have them in stock. Otherwise, find the “Stonehenge Kit” in our Amazon affiliate store here.

The little Stonehenge Kit comes with a map to show you where to place the stones – makes it easy-peasy. The stones are made of resin and are easy to drill.  Use florist’s rod or an old metal coat hanger and you’ll need 16 rods.

Decide on your plant material first. We used Irish Moss (Sagina subulata – it’s not really moss per se; it’s a perennial ground cover.) in the above display garden, which is about ½” deep and grown from a 4” pot planted the previous summer. For this how-to, we used 3″ long rods because our native moss is almost 2″ deep before the soil level starts.  The rods should go down into the soil at least 1” to stay firmly in place.

You may not have enough time before the end of the world to order the Stonehenge Kit so I’ve included a close up of the stones towards the end of the slideshow so you can make your own out of Polymer Clay or Fimo.

Happy Solstice!

Join us for your FREE weekly Mini Garden Gazette to have more miniature garden fun here.

[Posted on 19/12/2012] All sales through our online store are GUARANTEED. If the world does end on Friday, we will give you a complete refund!! ;o)

And whatever you do, make it FUN!

 

Shop Two Green Thumbs

Miniature Gardening with Two Green Thumbs

 

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Announcing the NEW Miniature Garden Society, 2.0!

Announcing the NEW Miniature Garden Society, 2.0!

It’s a brand new, totally focused website on everything gardening in miniature with all the bells and whistles!**

If you’ve been following us for awhile, you would have heard about our Miniature Garden Society member’s only website opening up a few months ago. Well, truth be told, it did get lots of kudos, oohs and ahhs, but it couldn’t add any community, forums or post-ability to make it just that more fun. BUT, alas! Have no fear because your miniature gardener is here!

Welcome to the NEW Miniature Garden Society website! It’s all that and more. Now that we have some roots and branches to the site, it’s time to get it really growing. Personally, I can’t wait because it’s a place to share all our ideas and information that didn’t fit into this book – nor did it fit into this book either. Lol!

Yup! Can’t tell you any more – need to get back to the new site! Learn more about it here. 

**May contain fairies. :o)

 

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

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Happy Father’s Day from America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center!

Fathers Day 2016 in the Miniature Garden

Happy Father’s Day from the Miniature Garden.

Happy Father’s Day from America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center!

We had fun putting this together for Dad’s special day. Have a wonderful Father’s Day weekend!

Click the photos to enlarge them.

Fathers Day 2016 in the Miniature Garden

The black water bowl was purchased years ago and has seen (felt?) several miniature gardens over the years. It’s the perfect shape for a miniature scene. This one is about 18″ in diameter.

The tree is a Seiju Dwarf Elm that we get in stock from time to time. The pot is 18″ across and drilled for drainage.

See the Garden Chair up in the online store here.

Fathers Day 2016 in the Miniature Garden

Here’s lookin’ at you, Dad! Have the camera make eye contact with the critter in your miniature garden – as if it was caught in the act. It starts the story.

Plants from left to right, click the links to see more photos and info in the store.

Dwarf Mondo Grass (Ophiopogon japonicus ‘Nana’)

Sea Foam (Herneria glabra) alternated with

Hens & Chicks (Semperviren tectorum)

Red Thyme behind the Dwarf Mondo Grass, upper right (Thymus praecox)

Fathers Day2016 in the Miniature Garden

Include a tiny scene to draw the viewer into your miniature garden. It’s the details that will keep them smiling. That is a HO scale model figure in the wee barbecue miniature garden. You can find those tiny accessories at your local train/hobby store.

See our Miniature Propane Barbecue here, a tiny rubber chicken is included!

Regular set of miniature Sedum Cuttings

See the genuine Cedar Oval Deck, made in the USA.

The Miniature Puppy Dog.

The Small Cedar Trellis.

The birdhouse, Miniature Tower with Steeple.

Fathers Day 2016 in the Miniature Garden

Keep it simple and avoid cluttering the scene. It makes it more play-able too. You have room to get in there and reposition the accessories at whim.

 

Barrel Planter, drilled for drainage!

Larger Sedum Cuttings.

Like this? Then you’ll love our FREE monthly Mini Garden Gazette! Our subscribers get first dibs on exclusive, true miniature trees, shrubs and plants, as well as any of our unique, realistic accessories and kits. Join us here.

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY WEEKEND!

FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT:

TwoGreenThumbs.com
America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center

Get an autographed copy from our store or find it on Amazon.com!

Click the photo to get an autographed copy from our store or find it on Amazon.com!

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Dear IRS – A Gardener’s Taxes Are Already Paid

Gardeners pay their own taxes in their own way. Pictured above is one of our tax collectors. He is 1/2" tall.

Gardeners pay their own taxes in their own way. Pictured above is a miniature version one of the tax collectors. He is 1/2″ tall.

(This was first published in April 2009 in a “Garden for All” garden column for the West Seattle Herald. It eventually turned into this blog that focuses on the miniature garden hobby. As with our tax code, it has been updated annually.)

Dear IRS – A Gardener’s Taxes Are Already Paid

This recent tax season spurred on yet another garden analogy from Yours Truly. I realized as gardeners we already pay taxes in our own way. I wonder if this could fly with the IRS? Here’s what I have redefined for gardeners so far:

Gardener Tax Filing Status – Choose one only – and you know who you are.
1. New Gardener
2. Not-So-New Gardener That Only Knows What She Grows
3. Gardener That Really Knows Better But Does It Anyway

Plant Sales Tax – You know those plant sales where you overbuy, or buy on impulse? Ya, you know what I mean. There were some plants that were definitely on your list and you bought them for a particular spot – those usually go into the ground first. And there are the plants that you fell in love with at first sight, bought on impulse, and will “find a spot for it later.” It is some of this latter group that invariably perish and die, either through hesitation or unintentional neglect. These dead plants are the plant sales tax that we already pay gradually throughout the year.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

Gardeners pay their own taxes in their own way. Pictured above is a miniature version one of the tax collectors. He is 1/2″ tall.

Garden Income Tax – You are very well acquainted with this one and you don’t even know it. This could easily be broken down into several sub-categories: Squirrel Tax, Mole Tax, Snail & Slug Tax, Aphid Tax… whatever you’d like to call it. We have to constantly give up portions our trees, plants, flowers and lawns all year ’round. I’ll never forget that day last summer when I saw Squirrel scamper away with my first fig from my new baby fig tree. – I was really taxed then! ;o)

Adjusted Garden Income – When you rescue that giant Zucchini from Squirrel, and just cut off the couple of bite marks at the end, the portion that is cut off should be subtracted from your Garden Income.

Shoulda Use Tax – This tax could be called the “I Shoulda Tax” but the government would probably change the slang into something boring. A good example of the Shoulda Use Tax in the gardening world is that gaping hole in the middle of your perennial plant that should of been divided months ago. A number of plants die if they don’t get divided in time, or start to look scraggly. Normally it’s the chore that we put off because we like the looks and the rewards of a well-established perennial – only to discover a few weeks into the growing season that we should have divided it last spring. Ground cover Thymes are good examples. Other applications involve not thinning out your vegetable starts and they get too crowded to grow and compromise the whole crop, or not digging and dividing your lily bulbs and they eventually flop over in the middle of the summer and smother your carpet of sedums. Now you can see how we pay our own garden taxes throughout the year.

Ignorance Tax
When you to adjust your gardening habits and garden bed location due to someone else’s ignorance and lack of caring. Multiply this total by howMiniature Gardening with Janit Calvo much work they create for you and divide by how many eyesores you have to contend with.
– Examples: When your neighbor plants trees that are not a good candidate for the spot and you have to watch a beautiful young Birch tree get hacked up because it’s growing into the power lines – and then look at it from your back deck forever. Or, his corkscrew willow is rapidly shading your well-established, 40 year old blueberries on your side of the fence. Ya, ignorance tax.

Garden Plot-erty Tax – Debit the part of the garden we had to give up for anything non-garden, like a new extension on the house, a bigger deck, etc. And credit yourself when you add more garden bed space by taking away from your lawn.

Hopeless Investment Tax – Those wonderful flower bulbs we sink into the ground only to have Squirrel dig them up for his dinner. Or, in our Seattle climate, the bulbs that never come back because they rotted through our wet winters. Any extreme weather loss falls under this category. For any record-breaking extreme or natural disaster, multiply total by 100.

Organic Gardening Exemptions – Any type of organic gardening practices automatically get a tax exemption. Rain barrels, beehives, bat houses, bird houses, hedgerows, composting, rain-gardening etc. Bonus exemptions include boycotting any corporation involved with environmentally-UNconscious business practices.

Exercise Tax – After those long spring days in the garden when your body isn’t used to the bending and hauling… ugh! We should get a break on Epsom salt, bubble bath and wine.

Enter total on Schedule G, Form 8888abc, line 84.3d. ;o)

Got a garden tax to share? Leave it in the comments below. And someone call the IRS – maybe we can get a better tax break next year.

Visit America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center: website & store.

Gardening in Miniature by Janit Calvo

The BEST book on the hobby by far! Click the picture to get your autographed copy from our online store. Available on Amazon[dot]com.  And now available in German on Amazon.de!

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Barbie Adds Curvy and Tall Miniature Gardeners

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

The Garden Gal. I forget what kind of Barbie it was before I customized it. This was made in 1999, before I started Two Green Thumbs.

Barbie Adds Curvy and Tall Miniature Gardeners

Thank you, Mattel, for adding us to your product line! We’ve been playing with you for years.

Here’s a little trip down the TGT memory lane this week as I put the final touches on the manuscript of my second book for Timber Press. (Find the first one, a bestseller, here on Amazon, or get one autographed here.)

This is Garden Gal, one of my adapted Barbies that I customized in 1999, (the last century!) before starting this busy-ness, Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center. I was experimenting with joining miniatures with gardening in different ways.

The Garden Gal was my second attempt at customizing Barbies. I still need more practice painting miniature faces, it’s as not easy to do as it looks. It was really fun to gather the items for the box, mess-up the clothes and to customize the box too.

Everything, including the doll, was threaded back in the box, just like a new Barbie. Too fun. Who needs to submit a manuscript when there are ideas like this to pursue????

Dig in for more details under each photo, click to enlarge the photos. Leave any questions in the comments!

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Some props came from Barbie, some from a miniature store and some we made ourselves.

 

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Remove Barbie’s face with Acetone. Get tiny brushes and a magnifier to paint for the details. It takes practice – I need more Barbies! Lol!

 

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

I cut the gloves from an old pair of full-sized gloves. The bulbs in the package are Allium seeds, I think.

 

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

The dirt on her clothes is a combination of dried coffee grounds and acrylic paint. The “soil” in the back is real soil, with any big chunks taken out.

 

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

The spool of string, the seed and soil bags can all be made from things around your home.

 

Custom Miniature Garden Barbie, www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

The backside of the box. I used the box she came in, and recovered in a collage to reflect the theme.

Love the idea of a garden in miniature? Visit our website and store here.

Keepin' it real in the miniature garden with TwoGreenThumbs.com

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