Posts Tagged hobby

Turning Up the Heat on the New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

You’ll find more photos of this scene in the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book. It’s a room box that I made in 1999 before I started the business. 

Turning Up the Heat on the New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

See what I did there? We’re at the end of a heatwave here in Seattle so I’ve got heat on the brain – or maybe my brain is just overheated.

This is kind of a “‘If the mountain will not come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain” blog. I’m bringing you the reviews to new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book because I just KNOW that you’ll enjoy it just as much as these people have!

It took awhile to accumulate these – people must have dove right into the projects from the book and forgot about leaving some feedback for us. Lol! BUT! No worries, we have some now thanks to our fellow miniature gardeners, friends, and my parents – Lol! Thought you might find that interesting at least as they both eagerly asked the same question.

The Log Border Fence project, behind the jug, is 3 years old in this photo.

Emailed Feedback:

Hey Janit,

I’m absolutely loving this latest book! So well-crafted in every way, beautifully written, wonderful photographs, and often times readily available materials. Really brilliant! I also just really got a chance to go through your kit too of the Mini patio mix, really well put together my friend.

All the best,
Michael Yurkovic
AtomicMiniature.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Hi Janit!

I just love your book! You write so well!  The book really flows and you know just when to add a bit of humor. I often had a smile on my face as I read.  🙂  The photos are gorgeous and the book feels so comfortable in my hands. It will always be a treasure!

Give Steve our best and thanks again for sharing your beautiful book!

Love,
Barb and Rick
Owens Gardens

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Hi Janit,

Thanks, your book arrived late yesterday afternoon. It is a very good looking piece of work, excellent Janit.

I assume the book is on sale, when do you get a reading on how the sales are going ?

Love ———————  Dad

 

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

The Miniature Atrium project is a fun one to play with. You’re not stuck with any one design so you can update, reinterpret, add to the scene or just play with it anytime.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

THANK YOU!!  I love it! – and the dedication –

Your book looks great – now I’m going to sit down and have a good look, page by page.  At first glance, it’s just like someone like me needs – detailed instructions. Boy, what a lot of detail!

How are the sales going? Or is it too early to tell?

Again, many thanks – I’m so glad to get this!

love,
Mom

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

HOLY CHRISTMAS CRACKERS.

Your book is fabulous.

Thorough. Charming. Endearing. Da Bomb Diggidy!

Can’t wait to see it sweep the world.

Congratulations,

Melissa,
EmpressofDirt.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Loved your book.  Michael brought it to Castine.  So I got a good look, congrats…

May your weeds be few and your blossoms many.

Pamela

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

The make-ahead Wedding Projects can, not only be therapeutic for a stressed-out bride, but it can also be your “perfect” wedding in miniature.

Feedback from Amazon:

From PSusan: If you are a fan of fairy gardens or miniature garden pots then this is the book for you. The Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop (Handmade Accessories for Your Tiny Living World) by Janit Calvo has a wealth of ideas with clear instructions on how to make it happen. The introduction is especially nice if you are new to this kind of gardening. The explanation and close-up photos of the tools used is extremely useful. For each individual project a detailed list of needed materials is given, making this a wonderful DIY resources.

The book is organized by theme with several that do not look too complicated. Others use tile work that increases the complexity. Two of my favorites are the Zen Sand Garden and the Wardian Case. The Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop is great especially for the whimsical child that stays within us as adults. The publisher through Net Galley provided a copy.

 

 

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Step by step projects vary in detail but they all teach you a technique or a skill can be adapted for many other ideas – large and small.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From dogdaysdog: Ahhhh – exactly what I needed to get my inspiration back! Calvo did a great job with the pics and gives great ideas for what one can create in a fun miniature garden. Guess what everyone on my Christmas list is getting this year! So fun to make and personalize to each individual. Get the book and get inspired!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From Dee: Janit has written a fun additional DIY book for the miniature gardener. The photos are very clear and appealing. The list of needed tools and supplies is very thorough. The chapters are themed and easy to follow and give plenty of information to complete the ideas presented. I only wish it had more.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

From the Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book. I needed images for the Workshop Chapter and this room box I made in 1999 was the perfect answer.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From SBA: Both of Janit Calvo’s books are essential for learning the basics of miniature gardening, and advanced techniques. Janit’s ideas are truly unique and fun to apply to my miniature gardens.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Okay, in all honesty there was one 2-star review but she thought it was a book about making fairy houses and fairy furniture. (Not sure why she would think that as all of the summaries and marketing material mentions the many different projects.) See it on Amazon here.

Well, there you have it. Have you got your copy yet? See more sneak-peeks for the book here, here and here.

Like this? Join us for your FREE Mini Garden Gazette newsletter delivered to your inbox each Friday, sign up here.

Want to dig even deeper in to this delicious hobby? Visit our Miniature Garden Society to see if it’s a good fit for you here.

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Dig Deeper with our New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book! Click the picture to get your autographed copy from our online store. 

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Leave a Comment

Four Ways To Improve Your Craft Skills

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

With the Miniature Garden Door Kit you can paint the trim before you put it together – so much easier and the results are perfect.

Four Ways To Improve Your Craft Skills

Hey, someone has to do it. Someone has to keep you inspired, right? As the sign says above my studio door, “Play Each Day.” So have no fear, I am here to help you in find a way to play each day! Just call me your creative-enabler.

But, alas, I know how it goes all too well: sometimes I don’t want to think to hard, nor do I want go hunting for the right

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

The Gnome Door is perfectly sweet. Like the Miniature Garden Door, you can paint the trim before you put it together for a very professional look. Shown above unpainted but still looks great. Click the pic to see more of it.

parts, and nor do want to be bothered doing the miniature math but I want to do something different! I so want to make something!

Geez, I sound like Goldilocks at a craft store. Lol!

CUE: Miniature Garden Kits!

I don’t know about you, but when I see a good kit that entices me by just looking at the pieces, I get excited. I can’t wait to get home, get my glue and my tools, sit down and work through the instructions and see what happens. There is a sense of satisfaction with a kit too – I think I would say it’s almost as satisfying as making something from scratch because, more often than not, it’s something you would never build from scratch anyway, right?

But, there was something else that was nagging at me as to why I enjoy kits so much. I think I found out why:

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

Our new Adirondack Chair Kit is the real deal. Historically accurate, perfectly to scale and very sturdy when done. Treat with wood hardener/preservative before leaving it outside. More about preserving wood in the Prop Shop Book. Click the photo to learn more about this new kit!

Kits improve your crafting skills.

Craft Kits – Kits are laced with ingenuity simply because they have to be broken down into kit. Whether it’s a new way to glue something, join parts together, or a simple accent piece that you would never have thought of adding, there is always something to learn from doing a craft kit because you’re “seeing” someone else’s way of doing something.

Bash a Kit Beforehand – If you know where you are going with the kit, you can easily bash* some of the parts and pieces before you glue it together. For example, if you were to make a rustic chair from the Adirondack Kit, you can get most of the painting done while the small pieces are still mounted in the sheet, before you punch them out. (See photo at left.) After you punch them out you can score, knick and or sand the parts to look worn and aged before gluing it all together. (See the Aging Adirondack project in the America chapter of the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book.)

Bash a Kit Afterwards – You can certainly do the aging techniques on the finished piece but you can also add decals, stamp patterns, embellish it to look more fairy-like with tendrils and mossy-bits tucked here and there. (See the Patriotic Chair and the Fairy Haven projects in the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book.)

*Bash a Kit – Means to adapt a kit to what you want it to be by adding to it or taking away from it. It’s a popular term in the model-kit world. For example, a model-maker would by a kit to build an army Jeep but would paint the pieces to his liking, add different decals to personalize it and make it completely different than what is was originally intended to look like.

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

It’s a MINIATURE Fairy House Kit! New from our studios. You can make a tiny fairy house for your miniature garden – CUTE!!

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

Assembled by hand with everything collected into one convenient box – more than enough to make your wee fairy house your very own. All you need is you and the glue!

Craft Different Types of Kits – Be sure to try different kinds of kits with different materials and unique designs. Stay tuned for more miniature garden kits coming up. We have some really fun ideas for you!

More Kits Coming Soon!

We are working on a variety of kits for the miniature garden and fairy garden. Some will be coming from our studios or from our Prop Shop book, and some of the kits are/will be developed by a pair of IGMA artisans who are so meticulously detailed and design oriented its humbling. Lol! Check out their kits here and let us know what you think. There is more to come from this dynamic duo!

Like this? Join us for your FREE weekly Mini Garden Gazette newsletter! Sign up here and confirm thru your email.

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Dig Deeper with our New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book!

Leave a Comment

Miniature Garden Tutorial Video: Understanding Scale

Miniature Garden Tutorial: Understanding Scale in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Garden Tutorial Video: Understanding Scale

Miniature Garden Tutorial: Understanding Scale

A large-sized miniature garden or 1″ scale. The pot is about 22″ across and about 1′ deep in the middle. I planted the tree and shrub closer to the middle of the pot so their roots will have plenty of room to grow.

Miniature gardening is just one way we can enjoy miniatures in today’s world. I’ve written about The Biggest Little Industry on Earth many years ago, and gathered a long list of how we love anything miniature. Heck, careers have been made out of miniatures and billions of dollars have been exchanged because of miniatures! Stop to think about how much they are a part of our every-day and you will see miniatures in a different light.

With all types of miniature-making, scale plays a very important role. Without using scale as a rule-of-thumb in your gardens, scenes or dioramas, the project would look like a random collection of items, a box or shelf full of stuff. I’ve written about the use of scale before too, (linked below,) but in the gardening in miniature world we used scale a bit differently – and I can’t think of any other comparison in the miniature industry so, again, this hobby stands apart from the rest.

You see, when the right miniature plants and trees are used in the miniature garden, it’s only the accessories that have to be in scale with each other. The plants we use and recommend at TwoGreenThumbs.com, for the most-part, adapt perfectly to almost any miniature scale. Check out the video demonstration to see how scale is used in this miniature garden and you’ll see what I mean.

AdS-leaderboard-TGTplants

The tree behind the birdbath is a Just Dandy Hinoki Cypress, the tree to the left is a Jacqueline Verkade Canada Hemlock. See what’s up in our store here, or shop by your zone here.

Your Miniature Garden Center

Apropos Proportion

Now let’s go a bit farther and talk a little about proportion, a valuable attribute for any kind of design, build or fabrication.

We know that the plants can adapt to any scale BUT the overall size of the garden is still a factor.

For example, if you use small-sized accessories for your in-ground garden, they won’t get noticed and will get lost at a distance. Large-sized accessories are ideal for in-ground because they can be seen from a-ways-away, like from your deck or from a window in the kitchen.

Different sized containers work better with certain scales too. Small accessories get lost in big pots and, this is a very common oversight, large-sized accessories can easily overwhelm small pots.

This is adapted from our bestselling Gardening in Miniature book, Chapter 3, Shrinking the Garden Rules:

  • For containers that are 2” to 5” wide, use small-sized (1/4″)miniature accessories.
  • For containers that are 5” to 10” wide, use medium-sized (1/2″) accessories.
  • For containers 10” and up, use large-sized (1″) containers.

Of course, with any creative rule, there is a bit of wiggle-room between the sizes/scales, but I think you get the gist.

In summary: Make sure all your accessories match in scale and are in proportion to the size of the container. For in-ground miniature gardens, use large-size or 1″ scale.

Link to more about scale, with more photo-examples:

Fun With Scale in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Gardening 105: Sizing Up Your Accessories

Shop by Size:

Shop all One Inch Scale

Shop all Half Inch Scale

Shop all Quarter Inch Scale

Let me know if you have any comments or questions below – it tells me what I’ve missed!

If you are serious about learning, creating and digging deeper into the miniature garden hobby, join us here.

Best selling Gardening in Miniature book

We wrote the book on it! All you need to get started in this wonderful hobby is in this book! Click the book to see it up in the online store. 

Leave a Comment

UPDATE: Miniature Garden Therapy Mission: Spark Joy!

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

Operation Spark Joy continues! Steve and I headed south to the Old Soldier’s Home in Orting, Wa., to check in on the garden and to decorate it for the Fourth. 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier’s Home

Hey! It’s working! The response we’re getting from our miniature garden that we built on behalf of The Miniature Garden Society at the Old Soldier’s Home in Orting, Wa., is collecting some terrific feedback! As we mentioned in the first blog, and as I was reminded of when I was speaking with one of the staff members, the staff is enjoying it just as much as the residents are. Lol!

But, I didn’t prepare for the one “being” that loves it too: SQUIRREL! I knew they were a bit of a pest from the feedback from the other gardeners, but I didn’t expect to lose entire plants to them. Our go-to method to deter these critters is cayenne pepper, (see our squirrel-blog here,) but it’s a public garden and I will never be sure who’s going to play in it. I am going to try planting larger plants instead, with deeper roots.

Anyway, here are the updated photos, click to enlarge (but I’m not sure this works on all platforms.) If you want to compare them to the initial planting, it’s here. You can see a lot of the more-fragile plants didn’t make it – and they were mostly Sedums that didn’t have a lot of roots at the time. An interesting lesson.

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

Our farmer’s fields will start to look better in the fall. The silo is holding up well. 

 

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

The micro gravel around the base of the silo was completely gone, so we hid the board with soil instead. I’ll need to think of a better solution that won’t wash away when the garden is watered – oh yeah! That’s my Mini Patio Mix Kit. Lol!  

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

What Hens and Chick were left were a bit tattered. We’ll fix it next time! :o)

 

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

This chair was one of my experiments for my new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book that is making its way to your local bookstore – or find it up on our online store here. I found an easier way to do the stars that became the project in the book. 

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

We met Gus this time and he told us that he keeps people from touching the garden all the time – he told us to keep our hands off too before we told hin what we were there for. We’ve since named him “Guardian of the Garden.” Lol! 

 

Find out how to make this Tree Dress that is very quick and easy to install, from our NEW Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book, click the ad above!

Comments (2)

EXTREME CUTE ALERT: 185 Reasons To Go To ‘The Miniature Show’

Dollhouse miniature garden accessories

Getting ready for The Miniature Show next week. Creating tiny accessories for the dollhouse miniature garden is one of my favorite things to do. 

EXTREME CUTE ALERT: 185 Reasons To Go To ‘The Miniature Show’

If you are a lover of anything miniature, you should be in Chicago next week.

If you’ve never been to a miniature show, this will totally blow your mind.

If you’ve never been to this kind of high-caliber miniature show, this will totally open your mind.

I am thrilled to have been invited to The Miniature Show at the Hyatt Regency in Schaumburg just outside of Chicago from April 20 to the 22nd. I’m one reason – the other 184 reasons are the miniaturists from all over the world (!) that will be vending along with me, or represented in the show through Swan House Miniatures

Here are some of my top reasons why you should come and enjoy The Miniature Show along with me:

  • Perfection in miniature. Do you love to get new things? Brand new, never “used?” Like that new car,
    Dollhouse miniature garden accessories

    What would it look like if it was left out in the garden for way too long?

    but after a about a year it doesn’t look so new anymore? How about your house? Same thing right? Well, with miniatures, you can have that level of perfection ALL THE TIME. Anything you want too. Anything. It’s out there in miniature. See the perfect miniature work of Jim Pounder here, he’ll be at next week’s The Miniature Show too.

  • Fantastic fantasy. You can have it all in small. If it’s really well-done, precise and clever, all fantasy in miniature can enchant because it looks so realistic. Believability can be sustained, if only for a moment. It’s awesome. How about a miniature table with chicken legs from Jason Getzan, see them here. One inch tall fairies by Penny Thomson here. Both Jason and Penny will be at The Miniature Show too.
  • Dollhouse miniature garden accessories

    You will find aging and customizing techniques all throughout my new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book coming out this June! 

    Miniature food that looks SO perfect, you can smell it. No joke. The realism is so awesome, it tricked my mind into thinking that I could smell whatever miniature food I was looking at. Carl Brondson is one of “those” miniaturists here.

  • New ideas, techniques and insight. Saved the best for last! By looking at other people’s miniature work, you can’t help but get different insights, new ideas and learn different techniques that will help you in your own work. You will be inspired to raise your own bar and try new things just by being around the experts. Here are all of the top miniaturists that you’ll be witnessing: see the complete list here.
miniature fairy house

A miniature fairy house for the miniature dollhouse garden. Getting back into the miniatures has been a blast – I’m SO glad I was invited to do this show!

Not Convinced Yet?

How about TWO MORE miniature shows happening at the same time with FREE shuttles going to back and forth every day to all three shows? Here’s the Chicago International Show website and the 3 Blind Mice Show’s website. See you there!

Like this? Join us and thousands of other miniature gardeners for your weekly does of all things miniature garden, The Mini Garden Gazette. Sign up through our new website, MiniatureGarden.com or visit America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center’s website, TwoGreenThumbs.com to join.

miniature garden accessories

Having fun using real materials to create my miniatures. This snail-shell planter is from a project in my new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book coming out this June. (2107)

Comments (3)

Growing, Evolving & Updating: Miniature Gardens vs. Fairy Gardens – What is the Difference?

Fairy door and windows.

Not a miniature garden but very cute! From the “Our Favorite Miniature Gardens” – and old album from HGTV.com

Miniature Gardens vs. Fairy Gardens – What is the Difference?

This is an update to a blog that I published on the difference between miniature gardening and fairy gardening about 6 1/2 years ago. 

I opened up a little can of worms the other day on our Facebook page.

Thankfully, I’m a little hardcore when it comes to gardening and I like worms.

Fairy Gardening with Two Green Thumbs.comI had created a post for our Facebook page that linked to a series of fairy gardens on HGTV.com (link has been changed) and suggested that they should start hanging out with us “real miniature gardeners.”

I must admit, that was a bit hasty in retrospect, but I didn’t mean to offend anyone so here’s an explanation of where that comment came from.

The first picture in the album was the one shown above, with a couple of windows and a door nailed to a tree with a fairy in front of it. Inside the album, however, there were a couple of pictures that were very pretty little fairy gardens, and pictures of a fairy house and a gnome house – but they were all fairy gardens, not miniature gardens. HGTV had called them miniature gardens – thus the comment “that they should start hanging out with us ‘real miniature gardeners.'”

A very pretty little Fairy Garden

From the HGTV.com album. Fairy gardens are a type of miniature garden and if there is a fairy in it, then the word ‘fairy’ belongs in the name.

“Why?” asked Facebook follower Patti Sherwood, the founder and leader of the Miniature and Fairy Garden forum on Garden Share.com (This forum appears to be dead now.) “… because I truly believe that every attempt at creating a garden of any kind should be applauded and not criticized.”

That is STILL a great question, Patti.

But I felt like Martha Stewart. She is always made fun of because of her quest for excellence and perfection. But, you know what? She raised our game. Martha made us want for a better home and a better life through the domestic arts. Heck, we didn’t even call it “domestic arts” until she did! It was called housework and cooking. How unglamorous… until Martha  came along and redefined it for us.

Yes, I think every attempt at gardening should be applauded, especially because plants help the air, reduce our stress, help the environment, and add comfort visually and emotionally.

But, promoting any type of gardening is not what I do. My focus is living miniature gardening.Janit's Mini Garden Etsy Store

“Lettuce define our terms.”
              – Kermit the Frog

 

A “Little” History

The term ‘miniature garden’ used to be an all-encompassing phrase for any small sized garden, living or artificial. It could be as big as a
small backyard or as small as a thimble-sized terrarium. Dish gardens, bonsai, penjing, rock gardening, railroad gardening, gnome gardening, tray gardening, windowsill gardening, teacup gardening, terrariums, vivariums and Wardian cases (I’ve probably missed some.) were all called miniature gardening before the miniature garden hobby took off. Now, the terms have officially changed.

So here is the definition of miniature gardening.

And yes, it is my own definition, I can not think of who else would have the authority and perspective to define it so I’ll claim it. You’ll now find this definition on many websites.

Living Miniature Gardens

Living Miniature Gardens include plants, patio/paths and an accessory all in scale with one another.

Definition: A miniature garden is the perfect blend of tiny trees, plants, hardscaping and garden accessories that are in scale with one another to create a lasting, living garden scene or vignette. Miniature gardens are gardens in miniature.

That’s it, right there.

And as a leader and a professional (like HGTV.com) I feel it is part of my job to bring out the best miniature gardener in everybody.

So, when one is adding a fairy figure to a bunch of plants and calling it a miniature garden, that isn’t right, it is a fairy garden.

A window and door hammered onto a tree is not a miniature garden. It could lead to one – but I would be hard-pressed to even call it a garden. Where are the plants?

A sign propped up in the corner with a fairy a pebble path is a fairy garden, not a “miniature garden” even though it is cute as a button.

And the “Our Favorite Miniature Gardens” on the HGTV.com site was an album of fairy gardens.

The Big Boys Aren’t Getting it Right

Best selling Gardening in Miniature book

We wrote the book on it.

It’s interesting to note that these types of big “garden” websites seem to not really care about being precise nor do they seem to care about teaching the right things to their viewers/readers.

I found another great example of this from the Better Homes and Gardens website recently, where they called a planted jello-mould a ‘terrarium’ and proceeded to plant up a dish garden incorrectly, (the charcoal layer is a filter and goes on top of the gravel,) called it a bundt pan, and used plants that have completely different watering and light needs – THEN they put a pebble path and a wee bench in it, technically making it a miniature garden. It is SO not a terrarium, it isn’t even funnySee it here.

I was a bit floored after viewing so I posted it in one of my independent garden center forums and asked if this type of information should be corrected by us, the professional gardeners in the industry. I had several store owners chime-in and basically said, “So what? It’s cute and it will sell fast. They’ll have to come back and buy more plants!” 

Oh. Dear. I was under the impression that customers are people that trust independent shop owners to sell them the right solutions that will work – not die. If a customer just wants to buy plants from an untrustworthy source that will die, that’s what big-box stores are for. :o)

So it seems that some store owners just want sell you anything and these big websites just want the traffic for their advertising revenue. BUT why they mis-inform their customers/readers leaves me very perplexed when it is just as easy to create and teach proper content?

Gee, I guess I’ve been doing it all wrong all these years, but at least I can sleep at night. Please enjoy our ad-free website and online store where we care about our customers, the information and the products we sell ~> ONLY at TwoGreenThumbs.com apparently!

What do you think? Am I being too picky about nomenclature? Leave a comment below about my current definition of what we do here at Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center and help us define what we do so we can continue to share, enjoy and create living miniature gardens.

Sophisticated Fairy Gardening, by Janit Calvo

Our new eBook! For Advanced Fairy Gardeners only. It’s an addendum to our Gardening in Miniature book. Click the picture for more.

Comments (38)

Faith, Hope and Pixie Dust: Miniature Gardening with Disney

faithhope

Faith, Hope and Pixie Dust: Miniature Gardening with Disney

[Updated from November, 2010.] A trip to the toy store the other day to lurk for miniature garden ideas instigated a trip to the video store to rent the latest fairy movie from Disney, Tinkerbell and the Great Fairy Rescue. It’s all in a day’s work here at America’s Favorite Miniature Garden Center.

You bet I watched it  – and no, I don’t have children, nor do I have a child in my life that I could borrow for the excuse to watch it. I just did.

Oh, you’re doing it again, aren’t you? You’re laughing at me!

Now this is the kind of invaluable market research that is part of my job as leader of the hobby, researcher of everything mini garden and owner of the world’s only Miniature Garden Center dedicated to gardening in miniature. It’s this is the level of sacrifice

;o)

Nah, really, I just wanted to see if there were any cute ideas I can share and, never-to-be-disappointed-by-Disney, there were more than a few new ideas that you can put in your bag of tricks the next time the kids or grand kids want to get miniature gardening.

Miniature Fairy Garden

Get the kid’s imaginations working with some hands-on fairy fun and magic in the miniature garden.

Fairy Origins and Lore via Disney

– Each time a baby laughs for the very first time, a fairy is born. This is called their Arrival Day, similar to our Birthdays. Wait. Did I hear a giggle?

Disney latest line of fairy toys can easily be used in the miniature garden.

Disney latest line of fairy toys can easily be used in the miniature garden.

– Fairies are from Pixie Hollow and each fairy has a different purpose. They come to the “mainland” to help with the change of the seasons by coloring the flowers in the spring, they help pollinate and tend to the gardens and crops in the summertime, paint the leaves in the fall and make icicles and snowflakes in the winter. Just place what they do before the word fairy and you can create any character for your own purpose. Examples include, “Wind Fairy, Pumpkin Fairy, Dog Fairy, Spruce Fairy, etc.

– Fairies are about 5” tall and are dressed in anything natural that usually illustrate their purpose. Flower fairies wear petals and leaves, the pumpkin fairies wear the pumpkin and the wind fairies… huh? Wait. Are they naked? Lol!

– The fairies help to put the hibernating animals to sleep in the fall or to wake them up in the spring. I wish they could do that for me when I can’t sleep at night. Oh, and they also take care of wounded animals everywhere.

– They paint the stripes on bumblebees and design the patterns on butterflies. Awesome.

– They use fireflies as flashlights. When you see a firefly, it is really fairy flying around.

– Male fairies are called Sparrowmen. They look like elves with wings and acorn hats. I love that name!

A pretty fairy in the mini garden.

A pretty fairy in the mini garden.

Points of Attraction

– Fairies love shiny objects just like me. Place a small mirror or something shiny in the garden to attract them – or me. Lol!

– They sometime use buttons as stepping-stones to lead the fairies to your fairy house. If you do use buttons, please don’t relay on your fairy to keep them in place. Instead, use our Mini Patio Mix Kit. It’s easy and fun to use.

– Create a wee leaf-plate for the “fairy offering” to help lure them into your garden. Fairies eat fruit, vegetables, seeds, nuts and bread. Place a wee snack as an offering and see if they take you up on it.

– Fairies smell slightly like cinnamon. If you catch a whiff, there is a fairy nearby but not the fairies are still not edible.

– They use mint leaves as a toothbrush and pine needle combs. They use cotton balls as pillows and leaves as blankets. Fairies prefer the natural house and lean-to’s so they can go inside and see out the windows.

If you are NOT going to see the movie, here’s a synopsis:

The mAd-Fairyovie was very fun in typical Disney fashion. The only characters are the Dad, the daughter and the fairies. The Dad is very pre-occupied with his work collecting, studying and mounting bugs and butterflies, which is completely horrific for a fairy to see! The daughter catches a fairy by accident (Tinkerbell) and they bond. Dad eventually finds out, catches a fairy and rushes to expose his find to the world. Just before it is too late, he is swayed when he sees his daughter flying with the fairies, pleading for the release of her friend. The fairies befriend the Dad and, with a heavy dose of pixie dust, make him fly too. I love the end where the Dad, daughter and all the fairies are all hanging out spending quality time together.

Checkout your local toy store for a number of different fairy figures to use in the miniature garden that are child-safe, washable and durable. Introduce fun and magic to the children while you still can.

Sign up to be on my mailing list to stay inspired here.

Like this? Please visit the Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center here. We appreciate your support to keep us going and we specialize in superior, personalized customer service!

See more:
Whimsical Fairy Swing DIY
About Miniature Fairy Garden Moss
Declutter Your Fairy Garden 

Checkout Disney’s wonderfully Interactive Pixie Hollow Website here.

Sophisticated Fairy Gardening, by Janit Calvo

NEW LOW PRICE!! Click the Picture to read the intro! An expert view on fairy gardening and how to make them look authentic in your miniature garden.

Comments (10)

Older Posts »
%d bloggers like this: