How to Identify an Expert on the Internet

Miniature Gardening: Go Ahead, Act Your Shoesize

Gardening in Miniature since 2001.

How to Identify an Expert on the Internet

“You can be anybody on the Internet!”

We’ve talked about this before on a previous blog post, about how the Internet is growing all kinds of experts. I’ve worked online since 2004 and have witnessed a number of great people gradually become the true experts in their field. I’ve also watched a few people try to become experts and, if they are good salespeople, they can trick people into thinking that they are indeed an expert.

You see, it is really a lot of hard work to become an expert, as Malcom Gladwell states in his bestselling book, The Outliers. Malcolm has calculated that it takes at least 10,000 hours devoted to one topic to become an expert. To put this in perspective, if you worked 8 hours a day, 5 days a week for 50 weeks per year, that’s only 2,000 hours. So, at best, if you really crammed and worked overtime, you might be able to crank-out 3000 hours per year. You still need at least 3 years of overtime, nights and weekends, to achieve the expert level of experience.

 

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

 

But, if you ask the Internet, apparently there are now quicker ways to become the expert, or at least appear to. Anyone can write their own blog and get a book published these days – anyone. (Always wanted to publish a book? Do it. There are publishers for everything and every level if you keep looking. Heck, you don’t even need to know how to write.) But, honestly and realistically, there is no quick way to dive deeply and thoroughly into any topic to become that expert overnight or within a month – experience just can’t be rushed.

There is SO much information out there on the interwebs these days, especially with the “real” fake-news sites, that you need to, you must, take the time to figure out if that blog/website/person that your looking at is authentic and has the right answers to your questions. Especially with gardening, doing the wrong thing in your garden can sometimes do lasting damage and ruin your outlook on gardening forever.

So, here is how you identify an expert, I’ve included some questions that you can ask yourself before you consider if the person is authentic. I don’t imagine this list isn’t complete at all, if you have another way to ID an expert, leave it below.

 

The definition of “authenticity” from Wikipedia:

Authenticity – of undisputed origin; genuine.
Synonyms – genuine, real, bona fide, true, veritable; legitimate, lawful, legal, valid

 

The Miniature Garden Society

Collecting expert advice on the new hobby of gardening in miniature is one of the reasons we set-up this wonderful Miniature Garden Society website for miniature gardeners only. All members get direct access to me, my library, my resources and my experience.

How to Recognize an Expert

You can’t fake passion – If she is coming out of the blue with a completely new topic all the time then she is just jumping on the next trend, and the next, and the next. Look to see if her blog/books/portfolio jump around too much and feel unfocused.

Does she stay within her area of expertise (subject-wise AND geographically?) – Does she have a number of different books published on different topics? Is she writing about gardening in different regions but has lived all her life in one state or area of the country?

Is she collecting credentials? – Look to see if she is a member of every group in the industry. No one can join every organization and still get practical work done – unless you join in name only – but I do believe organizations frown on that.

Does she jump around a lot with her job history while still claiming to be the expert? – Does she stay with one or two roles or are there a list of different jobs from different organizations but she only looks to be 30 years old? Does she specialize in chickens, grafting tomatoes, canning, year-round vegetable gardening and open, own and manage a full garden center and landscape business – and all within a couple of years? There is no time to learn anything thoroughly if you can’t stay put and learn the ropes.

Does she jump around a lot with her offers? – Does she promise to solve all your problems and plan your wedding too? You’re looking for an expert, remember.

Does she have any past work of her own to show? – If she is a gardener, does she have her own garden’s photos up on her website or blog? If she writes about miniature gardening, does she share any of her miniature gardens on her social media?

Listen to her talk. – Does she sound like she knows what she is doing or is she just filling the airwaves with the obvious? Does she sound confident? Can she articulate what you need to know? Does she explain things well? This is especially important if you are paying for services. I hired an editor through email to help me edit my first manuscript for Gardening in Miniature. When I spoke to her on the phone after the contract was signed, I was extremely disappointed in her lack of expertise and confidence. Needless to say she couldn’t complete the job and passed it back to me after sitting on it for 6 months (then she went and published her own book on miniature gardens a couple of years later, believe it or not.)

And the kicker: she could just be a good salesperson and she knows which buttons to push to get you to buy into her game. Marketing and selling is actually a formula that has phycological triggers that can be used to lure you into buying if you aren’t careful.

UPDATE: An insightful example: My cousin has worked for the Yamaha Corporation in their drum department for over 25 years now. He has the constant challenge of getting celebrity drummers to endorse drums for Yamaha and he has noticed that the most talented drummers are not interested in marketing themselves – they just want to play drums. It’s the less-talented drummers that shine at the marketing themselves and thus get all the attention. After hearing this, I’ve noticed it across many industries – the most creative people are busy claiming their gifts and creating – not facebooking and tweeting.

So next time you are in need of some expert information, use your intuition and do some quick Googling around with the above list to see if they have any experience logged anywhere to back up who she claims to be.

Then, if you’ve figured out that they are genuine and you like them – bookmark them in your browser as one to go to for the right answers. Maybe if we keep patronizing the real experts, the fake ones will move along and go after the next “shiny thing.”

End of rant. Stay real.

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

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Oh Deer! Tips on How to Keep the Deer and Rabbits from Invading your Gardens

Apparently the garden deterrents for deer are the same for rabbits. Collecting regional tips from our Miniature Garden Society members is just one of the perks of joining us!

Oh Deer! Tips on How to Keep the Deer and Rabbits From Invading Your Gardens

Alright, truth be told, I don’t know everything about miniature gardening BUT that’s only because I can’t live everywhere.

You see, I live in the city so my experience with keeping wildlife out of my garden is quite limited – unless you consider my husband as wildlife which happens from time to time – and yes, he is hard to keep out of the garden. My dog, Kitty, takes care of the squirrels and attempted visits from the neighbor’s cats trying to get to the catnip but, other than that, the only other wildlife we need to be concerned about here in Seattle are slugs and snails.

So, this is where the Miniature Garden Society comes in.

The Miniature Garden Society is a member’s-only website and a place where I can put all the information I’ve collected on the hobby, and also add insight from the other members of the Society that have more experience with a certain issues than I do. And it’s only going to get better as more people from different areas join us. Right now we have fellow miniature gardeners from all over the US and from Canada, India and the UK.

There is a forum in the website too, so you can asked the Collective directly for insight, opinions or any other ideas on that you are working on.

(See our Squirrel blog here.)

 

“The Miniature Garden Society is like an encyclopedia for miniature gardening!”

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Dig Deeper with our New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book! Come and get your autographed copy at the Trunk Show and WorkSHOP too!

Excerpt from The Miniature Garden Society: 

Here is a perfect example from the website, it’s our Deer and Rabbit Tips from the Troubleshooting Page in the Gardening Section. It was created with some of the info I found in my own library, but the plant suggestions came from one of our members, Karen from Virginia, who has direct experience with deer in her garden.

Deer and Rabbits

Some of this research came from Nancy Norris’ book, Miniature Garden Guidebook: for Beautiful Rock Gardens, Container Plantings, Bonsai and Garden Railways, (Kalmbach Books, WI, 2011). Note that this is a book focused on railroad gardening despite the title. The plant suggestions that are in this book are meant to be viewed from afar – not up close like we view our miniature gardens. There are, however, useful tidbits throughout the book, plus insight into how to keep deer out of the garden. A full review of the book will be up in the MiniatureGardenSociety.org soon.)

Nancy’s Suggestions for Repelling Deer:

  • Use stinky deer spray. Deer hate smelly stuff. Two eggs, garlic cloves (she doesn’t say how many,) cayenne pepper and castor oil for the spray to stick on the plants. Blend with “some” water and let it stew for 2 days. Strain and spray.
  • “Deer don’t like their food associated with dead animals, like eggs and soap.”
  • Any noise deterrents, like clicking fountains, they get used to.
  • Any random sprinklers only work for a short time.
  • Store bought repellents, Plant Pro-Tecs (garlic) or Liquid Fence (NOT a urine spray, as Nancy states, it’s made up of eggs, garlic, kelp and a few other things.)
  • If you build a fence, make it high and solid – deer won’t jump over it if they can’t see to the other side.

IMPORTANT: Nancy mentions that you still need to protect newly planted deer-resistant plants because the plants that come fresh from the nursery are often fertilized with inorganic fertilizers that are made from salt. Just like cows love salt blocks, apparently deer love the salts in the soil. After planting, feed the plants compost, organic seaweed solution or bone meal sparingly. (The salt-fertilizers will gradually leach out of the soil, but she doesn’t say how long it will take.)

Further Research

  • Apparently the same rules apply for rabbits.
  • Deer stay away from any poisonous plants, prickly plants and strong-scented plants, like herbs.
  • Plant red-twig dogwood around the perimeter, deer love them and will fill-up on them, leaving your other plants alone. The dogwood shrub can handle the constant pruning, apparently.
  • Hanging CDs, twirly garden art or flags.
  • Irish Spring soap shavings – it’s the strong scent again. Replace shavings after a couple of rainfalls. Some hang them in nylon stockings around the perimeter of the garden.

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Deer-resistant Plants for Miniature Gardening:

Deer repellent tips and apparently the same for rabbits too.

Deer-resistant Plants for Miniature Gardening:

Trees

Cedar
Crape Myrtles
Cypress
Dwarf Alberta Spruce
Elms
Hollies (Ilex crenata unconfirmed)
Junipers
Pines
Willows

Shrubs

Arborvitae
Barberries
Boxwood
Cotoneaster
Euonymus

Perennials

Ajuga
Astilbes
Ferns – all
Grasses, ornamental
(Mondo grass not confirmed)
Moss
Sedums
Thymes

UPDATE / NEW INFO:

This comes from Fellow MG, Diane: “To keep deer away, spray SKYYD on everything.  A good covering spray will last quite a while even in the rain.  It works very well but as soon as you lapse and don’t get it sprayed in time, the deer move in.  It smells just awful after it’s mixed.  Blood, dead something. It now comes in powder form and you mix your own. Beyond awful smelling.  But it keeps the deer away, so I’m ok with it!”

See their website here: www.plantskydd.com/

And this is currently Susan’s latest tactic which we still need to see if it works over the winter – Susan is trying to distract them with a yummy lawn-replacement: “We have heavy deer predation here and woodchucks are also quite a problem. I am experimenting by replacing the “lawn” with microclover. My goal is to make mowing go away and to perhaps divert the critters from my perennials. Microclover is supposedly less invasive than Dutch White-I do not want it sneaking off into the woods that surround us. Time will tell, but the tender tasty clover is definitely popular with the deer, woodchucks and even turkeys. I am hesitant to say it is working, lest I jinx it. Now the overwinter test.”

Like this? Then you’ll love our Miniature Garden Society website! Learn more about it here.


Miniature Garden Gift Ideas from Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center!

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Turning Up the Heat on the New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

You’ll find more photos of this scene in the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book. It’s a room box that I made in 1999 before I started the business. 

Turning Up the Heat on the New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

See what I did there? We’re at the end of a heatwave here in Seattle so I’ve got heat on the brain – or maybe my brain is just overheated.

This is kind of a “‘If the mountain will not come to Muhammad, then Muhammad must go to the mountain” blog. I’m bringing you the reviews to new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book because I just KNOW that you’ll enjoy it just as much as these people have!

It took awhile to accumulate these – people must have dove right into the projects from the book and forgot about leaving some feedback for us. Lol! BUT! No worries, we have some now thanks to our fellow miniature gardeners, friends, and my parents – Lol! Thought you might find that interesting at least as they both eagerly asked the same question.

The Log Border Fence project, behind the jug, is 3 years old in this photo.

Emailed Feedback:

Hey Janit,

I’m absolutely loving this latest book! So well-crafted in every way, beautifully written, wonderful photographs, and often times readily available materials. Really brilliant! I also just really got a chance to go through your kit too of the Mini patio mix, really well put together my friend.

All the best,
Michael Yurkovic
AtomicMiniature.com

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Hi Janit!

I just love your book! You write so well!  The book really flows and you know just when to add a bit of humor. I often had a smile on my face as I read.  🙂  The photos are gorgeous and the book feels so comfortable in my hands. It will always be a treasure!

Give Steve our best and thanks again for sharing your beautiful book!

Love,
Barb and Rick
Owens Gardens

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Hi Janit,

Thanks, your book arrived late yesterday afternoon. It is a very good looking piece of work, excellent Janit.

I assume the book is on sale, when do you get a reading on how the sales are going ?

Love ———————  Dad

 

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

The Miniature Atrium project is a fun one to play with. You’re not stuck with any one design so you can update, reinterpret, add to the scene or just play with it anytime.

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THANK YOU!!  I love it! – and the dedication –

Your book looks great – now I’m going to sit down and have a good look, page by page.  At first glance, it’s just like someone like me needs – detailed instructions. Boy, what a lot of detail!

How are the sales going? Or is it too early to tell?

Again, many thanks – I’m so glad to get this!

love,
Mom

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HOLY CHRISTMAS CRACKERS.

Your book is fabulous.

Thorough. Charming. Endearing. Da Bomb Diggidy!

Can’t wait to see it sweep the world.

Congratulations,

Melissa,
EmpressofDirt.com

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Loved your book.  Michael brought it to Castine.  So I got a good look, congrats…

May your weeds be few and your blossoms many.

Pamela

 

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http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

The make-ahead Wedding Projects can, not only be therapeutic for a stressed-out bride, but it can also be your “perfect” wedding in miniature.

Feedback from Amazon:

From PSusan: If you are a fan of fairy gardens or miniature garden pots then this is the book for you. The Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop (Handmade Accessories for Your Tiny Living World) by Janit Calvo has a wealth of ideas with clear instructions on how to make it happen. The introduction is especially nice if you are new to this kind of gardening. The explanation and close-up photos of the tools used is extremely useful. For each individual project a detailed list of needed materials is given, making this a wonderful DIY resources.

The book is organized by theme with several that do not look too complicated. Others use tile work that increases the complexity. Two of my favorites are the Zen Sand Garden and the Wardian Case. The Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop is great especially for the whimsical child that stays within us as adults. The publisher through Net Galley provided a copy.

 

 

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Step by step projects vary in detail but they all teach you a technique or a skill can be adapted for many other ideas – large and small.

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From dogdaysdog: Ahhhh – exactly what I needed to get my inspiration back! Calvo did a great job with the pics and gives great ideas for what one can create in a fun miniature garden. Guess what everyone on my Christmas list is getting this year! So fun to make and personalize to each individual. Get the book and get inspired!

 

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From Dee: Janit has written a fun additional DIY book for the miniature gardener. The photos are very clear and appealing. The list of needed tools and supplies is very thorough. The chapters are themed and easy to follow and give plenty of information to complete the ideas presented. I only wish it had more.

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Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

From the Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book. I needed images for the Workshop Chapter and this room box I made in 1999 was the perfect answer.

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From SBA: Both of Janit Calvo’s books are essential for learning the basics of miniature gardening, and advanced techniques. Janit’s ideas are truly unique and fun to apply to my miniature gardens.

 

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Okay, in all honesty there was one 2-star review but she thought it was a book about making fairy houses and fairy furniture. (Not sure why she would think that as all of the summaries and marketing material mentions the many different projects.) See it on Amazon here.

Well, there you have it. Have you got your copy yet? See more sneak-peeks for the book here, here and here.

Like this? Join us for your FREE Mini Garden Gazette newsletter delivered to your inbox each Friday, sign up here.

Want to dig even deeper in to this delicious hobby? Visit our Miniature Garden Society to see if it’s a good fit for you here.

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Dig Deeper with our New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book! Click the picture to get your autographed copy from our online store. 

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

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Four Ways To Improve Your Craft Skills

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

With the Miniature Garden Door Kit you can paint the trim before you put it together – so much easier and the results are perfect.

Four Ways To Improve Your Craft Skills

Hey, someone has to do it. Someone has to keep you inspired, right? As the sign says above my studio door, “Play Each Day.” So have no fear, I am here to help you in find a way to play each day! Just call me your creative-enabler.

But, alas, I know how it goes all too well: sometimes I don’t want to think to hard, nor do I want go hunting for the right

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

The Gnome Door is perfectly sweet. Like the Miniature Garden Door, you can paint the trim before you put it together for a very professional look. Shown above unpainted but still looks great. Click the pic to see more of it.

parts, and nor do want to be bothered doing the miniature math but I want to do something different! I so want to make something!

Geez, I sound like Goldilocks at a craft store. Lol!

CUE: Miniature Garden Kits!

I don’t know about you, but when I see a good kit that entices me by just looking at the pieces, I get excited. I can’t wait to get home, get my glue and my tools, sit down and work through the instructions and see what happens. There is a sense of satisfaction with a kit too – I think I would say it’s almost as satisfying as making something from scratch because, more often than not, it’s something you would never build from scratch anyway, right?

But, there was something else that was nagging at me as to why I enjoy kits so much. I think I found out why:

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

Our new Adirondack Chair Kit is the real deal. Historically accurate, perfectly to scale and very sturdy when done. Treat with wood hardener/preservative before leaving it outside. More about preserving wood in the Prop Shop Book. Click the photo to learn more about this new kit!

Kits improve your crafting skills.

Craft Kits – Kits are laced with ingenuity simply because they have to be broken down into kit. Whether it’s a new way to glue something, join parts together, or a simple accent piece that you would never have thought of adding, there is always something to learn from doing a craft kit because you’re “seeing” someone else’s way of doing something.

Bash a Kit Beforehand – If you know where you are going with the kit, you can easily bash* some of the parts and pieces before you glue it together. For example, if you were to make a rustic chair from the Adirondack Kit, you can get most of the painting done while the small pieces are still mounted in the sheet, before you punch them out. (See photo at left.) After you punch them out you can score, knick and or sand the parts to look worn and aged before gluing it all together. (See the Aging Adirondack project in the America chapter of the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book.)

Bash a Kit Afterwards – You can certainly do the aging techniques on the finished piece but you can also add decals, stamp patterns, embellish it to look more fairy-like with tendrils and mossy-bits tucked here and there. (See the Patriotic Chair and the Fairy Haven projects in the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book.)

*Bash a Kit – Means to adapt a kit to what you want it to be by adding to it or taking away from it. It’s a popular term in the model-kit world. For example, a model-maker would by a kit to build an army Jeep but would paint the pieces to his liking, add different decals to personalize it and make it completely different than what is was originally intended to look like.

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

It’s a MINIATURE Fairy House Kit! New from our studios. You can make a tiny fairy house for your miniature garden – CUTE!!

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Gardening in Miniature Kits from Two Green Thumbs

Assembled by hand with everything collected into one convenient box – more than enough to make your wee fairy house your very own. All you need is you and the glue!

Craft Different Types of Kits – Be sure to try different kinds of kits with different materials and unique designs. Stay tuned for more miniature garden kits coming up. We have some really fun ideas for you!

More Kits Coming Soon!

We are working on a variety of kits for the miniature garden and fairy garden. Some will be coming from our studios or from our Prop Shop book, and some of the kits are/will be developed by a pair of IGMA artisans who are so meticulously detailed and design oriented its humbling. Lol! Check out their kits here and let us know what you think. There is more to come from this dynamic duo!

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Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Dig Deeper with our New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book!

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Miniature Garden Tutorial Video: Understanding Scale

Miniature Garden Tutorial: Understanding Scale in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Garden Tutorial Video: Understanding Scale

Miniature Garden Tutorial: Understanding Scale

A large-sized miniature garden or 1″ scale. The pot is about 22″ across and about 1′ deep in the middle. I planted the tree and shrub closer to the middle of the pot so their roots will have plenty of room to grow.

Miniature gardening is just one way we can enjoy miniatures in today’s world. I’ve written about The Biggest Little Industry on Earth many years ago, and gathered a long list of how we love anything miniature. Heck, careers have been made out of miniatures and billions of dollars have been exchanged because of miniatures! Stop to think about how much they are a part of our every-day and you will see miniatures in a different light.

With all types of miniature-making, scale plays a very important role. Without using scale as a rule-of-thumb in your gardens, scenes or dioramas, the project would look like a random collection of items, a box or shelf full of stuff. I’ve written about the use of scale before too, (linked below,) but in the gardening in miniature world we used scale a bit differently – and I can’t think of any other comparison in the miniature industry so, again, this hobby stands apart from the rest.

You see, when the right miniature plants and trees are used in the miniature garden, it’s only the accessories that have to be in scale with each other. The plants we use and recommend at TwoGreenThumbs.com, for the most-part, adapt perfectly to almost any miniature scale. Check out the video demonstration to see how scale is used in this miniature garden and you’ll see what I mean.

AdS-leaderboard-TGTplants

The tree behind the birdbath is a Just Dandy Hinoki Cypress, the tree to the left is a Jacqueline Verkade Canada Hemlock. See what’s up in our store here, or shop by your zone here.

Your Miniature Garden Center

Apropos Proportion

Now let’s go a bit farther and talk a little about proportion, a valuable attribute for any kind of design, build or fabrication.

We know that the plants can adapt to any scale BUT the overall size of the garden is still a factor.

For example, if you use small-sized accessories for your in-ground garden, they won’t get noticed and will get lost at a distance. Large-sized accessories are ideal for in-ground because they can be seen from a-ways-away, like from your deck or from a window in the kitchen.

Different sized containers work better with certain scales too. Small accessories get lost in big pots and, this is a very common oversight, large-sized accessories can easily overwhelm small pots.

This is adapted from our bestselling Gardening in Miniature book, Chapter 3, Shrinking the Garden Rules:

  • For containers that are 2” to 5” wide, use small-sized (1/4″)miniature accessories.
  • For containers that are 5” to 10” wide, use medium-sized (1/2″) accessories.
  • For containers 10” and up, use large-sized (1″) containers.

Of course, with any creative rule, there is a bit of wiggle-room between the sizes/scales, but I think you get the gist.

In summary: Make sure all your accessories match in scale and are in proportion to the size of the container. For in-ground miniature gardens, use large-size or 1″ scale.

Link to more about scale, with more photo-examples:

Fun With Scale in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Gardening 105: Sizing Up Your Accessories

Shop by Size:

Shop all One Inch Scale

Shop all Half Inch Scale

Shop all Quarter Inch Scale

Let me know if you have any comments or questions below – it tells me what I’ve missed!

If you are serious about learning, creating and digging deeper into the miniature garden hobby, join us here.

Best selling Gardening in Miniature book

We wrote the book on it! All you need to get started in this wonderful hobby is in this book! Click the book to see it up in the online store. 

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Who Else Wants to Grow Their Own World?

Gardening in Miniature with Janit Calvo

Click the picture to register for the WorkSHOP, from 2 to 4pm. Or come by and check out the Trunk Show anytime between 2 and 6pm. Either way, you WILL leave inspired, I guarantee it. 

Who Else Wants to Grow Their Own World?

You’ll go home happy and truly inspired. I know that for a fact because everyone that has taken a workshop with me has not only gone home pleased-as-punch, but a bit giddy too. Lol!

So come and get your own miniature garden together with us! We’ve chosen our favorite miniature garden kit because it’s good for indoors, or outdoors in the greater Seattle region. Indoors, it will need bright indirect light – if you don’t have it, I have a very easy solution for that too – AND it’ll match your decor!

It’s also a book signing! Come and pick up your copy of the NEW Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop: Handmade Accessories for Your Tiny Living World – hot off the press! You can finally find out what the fuss is all about!

Gardening in Miniature with Janit Calvo

This is the miniature garden that you will make at the WorkSHOP on July 15th! A calm, serene little scene that you can call your own. You don’t have to design it like it did, either – you can do you own thing because, after all, it is your own world. :o)

 

 

Gardening in Miniature with Janit Calvo

The WorkSHOP is only $75 and it includes learning all about what plants, parts and pieces to use so you can build your own miniature gardens at home, anytime you want to – or anytime you need a great gift to give!! The class supplies, if bought separately, will cost you almost $100 + shipping! (Yes plus shipping, because you simply can’t get some of this stuff at any brick & mortar store!)

 

Gardening in Miniature with Janit Calvo

I’ll be bringing more miniature gardens, garden accessories, fairy garden ideas and dollhouse garden miniatures too! The Trunk Show is on during and after the WorkSHOP and goes to 6pm! 

 

 

Gardening in Miniature with Janit Calvo

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Dig Deeper with our New Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book! Come and get your autographed copy at the Trunk Show and WorkSHOP too. Copies will be available at The Handmade Showroom even after this event. 

See The Handmade Showroom’s website here.

See the Pacific Place’s website here – there is parking!

See Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center here.

See MiniatureGarden.com for everything you need for this wonderfully creative hobby here. 

Like this? Want a FREE dose of miniature gardening almost every Friday? Join us for the world’s only newsletter on the hobby, The Mini Garden Gazette! (scroll down a bit. :o)

Gardening in Miniature with Janit Calvo

Click the picture to register for the WorkSHOP! The Trunk Show is on until 6pm the same day! 

 

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UPDATE: Miniature Garden Therapy Mission: Spark Joy!

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

Operation Spark Joy continues! Steve and I headed south to the Old Soldier’s Home in Orting, Wa., to check in on the garden and to decorate it for the Fourth. 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier’s Home

Hey! It’s working! The response we’re getting from our miniature garden that we built on behalf of The Miniature Garden Society at the Old Soldier’s Home in Orting, Wa., is collecting some terrific feedback! As we mentioned in the first blog, and as I was reminded of when I was speaking with one of the staff members, the staff is enjoying it just as much as the residents are. Lol!

But, I didn’t prepare for the one “being” that loves it too: SQUIRREL! I knew they were a bit of a pest from the feedback from the other gardeners, but I didn’t expect to lose entire plants to them. Our go-to method to deter these critters is cayenne pepper, (see our squirrel-blog here,) but it’s a public garden and I will never be sure who’s going to play in it. I am going to try planting larger plants instead, with deeper roots.

Anyway, here are the updated photos, click to enlarge (but I’m not sure this works on all platforms.) If you want to compare them to the initial planting, it’s here. You can see a lot of the more-fragile plants didn’t make it – and they were mostly Sedums that didn’t have a lot of roots at the time. An interesting lesson.

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

Our farmer’s fields will start to look better in the fall. The silo is holding up well. 

 

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

The micro gravel around the base of the silo was completely gone, so we hid the board with soil instead. I’ll need to think of a better solution that won’t wash away when the garden is watered – oh yeah! That’s my Mini Patio Mix Kit. Lol!  

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

What Hens and Chick were left were a bit tattered. We’ll fix it next time! :o)

 

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

This chair was one of my experiments for my new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book that is making its way to your local bookstore – or find it up on our online store here. I found an easier way to do the stars that became the project in the book. 

 

Miniature Garden at the Washington Old Soldier's Home

We met Gus this time and he told us that he keeps people from touching the garden all the time – he told us to keep our hands off too before we told hin what we were there for. We’ve since named him “Guardian of the Garden.” Lol! 

 

Find out how to make this Tree Dress that is very quick and easy to install, from our NEW Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book, click the ad above!

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