Archive for Fairy Gardening

Fairy or Angel? Here’s a Quick Way to Tell the Difference.

Angels and Fairies, what is the difference?

A stroll through Molbak’s fairy garden department during Christmas time gave me more than a few examples of the difference between fairies and angels.

Fairy or Angel? Here’s a Quick Way to Tell the Difference.

I was working on a miniature garden for the Miniature Garden Society‘s outreach program and a fellow miniature gardener brought out an angel statue to see if it would fit into our plan. I said, “What a pretty angel.” and she quickly said, “I thought you didn’t like fairies** in your gardens?”

Shortly thereafter, a fellow MG commented on a photo of a miniature praying angel statue on my Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Facebook page, photo is shown to the right. She said, “Oh, what a cute fairy!” That made me realize the difference between fairies and angels aren’t that obvious to some folks – yet.

So, how do you tell? Let me bring to light the differences and similarities between fairies and angels that may help you distinguish between the two. And no, you won’t find this kind of reporting anywhere else. Lol!

Angels and Fairies, what is the difference?

Angels and Fairies, what is the difference?

This fairy wears wings like a butterfly. The wings are one of the main characteristic that defines the two.

How Fairies and Angels are the Same:

– Every culture has some type of fairy.

– Every religion has some type of angel, aka spiritual being, deva, or cherub, generally speaking.

– Fairies are sometimes regarded as spiritual beings too.

– Fairies and angels can be guardians or guides

– They both have wings.

Angels and Fairies, what is the difference?

Moth wings? Fairies will have wings that look like insect wings. Dragonfly wings are especially popular with the fairy designers too.

Angels and Fairies, what is the difference?

Bird-like wings have a certain majesty to them that suits angels better than insect wings, don’t you think?

How Fairies and Angels are Different

– Fairies seem more ethereal than angels. (Ethereal means extremely delicate and light.) Fairies are small and angels are usually our size. Cherubs are usually shown as human babies or young children.

– Fairies are of the earth and angels are from the heavens.

– Angels are religious and fairies, not so much, although some do regard them as spiritual beings. (It’s optional for druids, apparently.)

– Fairy wings look like insect wings, similar to dragonfly or butterfly wings. Angel wings are bird’s wings and feathered. They tend to be bigger and more dramatic than a fairy’s utilitarian insect wings.

– Fairies are usually clothed in bright colored naturals: flower petals, leaves or some sort of plant. Angels are usually shown in soft, pastel-colored cloth robes or gowns.

Angels and Fairies, what is the difference?

Sometimes the wings are mounted separately but most times they seem to be joined in the back. Either way, angel’s wings

Whether you believe in angels or fairies, you are right.

When I envision angels flying, I can see their powerful feathered wings swooping, soaring and gliding. When I picture fairies flying, they are buzzing and darting around like a hummingbird. Disney captures this feeling with how they make Tinkerbell flit around so fast that she becomes a blur.

So, there you have it – that, and about $4 will get you a cup of regular coffee just about anywhere. Lol! Leave any comments, compliment, complaints or concerns below.

Hey, I do take a break from the realistic miniature garden to enjoy some fantasy fairy gardening from time to time. Here are just a couple blogs about fairy gardening from this blog:

Decorating Your Fairy Houses

Fairy Garden Moss: What They Won’t Tell You But I Will

Fairy Gardens Vs. Miniature Gardens ~ What’s the Difference?

Faith, Hope and Pixie Dust

How to Get the Garden into Your Fairy Garden

VIDEO – Design Ideas for Your Fairy Garden

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(** I don’t do any figures of any kind in my miniature gardens because then it becomes the fairy’s garden – of the figure’s garden. It’s no longer my own little world if there is “someone else” in the scene. I’m a bit selfish that way. Lol! Note that this is a constant debate in the dollhouse miniature world and in the model railroad world too.)

Fairy Gardening with Two Green


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How to Swim in Soil

An in-ground miniature garden just needs a mulch of compost each spring to keep the soil nutrient-rich. Save your fertilizers for your annuals and vegetables. The bee house is about 1 inch tall.

How to Swim in Soil

I’m a self-taught gardener. I don’t like unnecessarily complicated things. When any topic gets too scientific or complex, my eyes glaze over and I start to think about lunch. With our already hectic lives, some think we must know about the microcosms and ratios in our potting soil or garden soil in order to be a gardener, but – don’t tell anyone – I don’t. I haven’t. Because I don’t need to.

Now keep in mind, I’m a gardener. I’m not a grower. I don’t have a greenhouse. I don’t have any sort of grow-your-own set-up here at my backyard nursery. I have tried it but growing my own stock but it just isn’t where my passion is. I do grow my own veggies and annuals from seed for my full-sized gardening adventures, but that’s where it stops. However, if you are getting into growing seriously, you will want to focus on the content of your soil.

There’s an old saying that if you have $1 to spend on your garden, spend 90 cents on soil, and 10 cents on plants.

And I’ve written about soil before, it’s the first chapter in our popular Miniature Gardening 101 Series: The Dirt on the Soil. And, I talk about it in here, How to Plant a Miniature Garden in a Big Pot.

But what about all the different kinds of potting soil out there? What’s the diff? What do we use for miniature gardening? What will work best? Oh, and how much? Grab a cuppa, and let’s get down to the roots of the situation, shall we?

“If you are making mistakes it means you are out there doing something.”

For Pots and Containers

For all containers, use organic potting soil. Note that a lot of companies have hooked their wagons to the “organic” trend and, well, soil IS already organic, so isn’t that redundant? Not in this day and age, unfortunately. By organic, I mean without any added fertilizers or water-retaining polymers.

A great example is Miracle-Gro soil. It’s everywhere now and everyone sells it only because they have the money for marketing it. (It’s made by Scott’s. Monsanto owns Scott’s. Icky.) You’ll find somewhere on that bag of soil it will say ‘organic.’ But those added fertilizers and water-retaining polymers is the WORST soil you can use for your miniature garden or fairy garden simply because of the extra “stuff” in the soil. The extra fertilizers burn the roots of our plants and trees and those polymers don’t let the soil dry out often enough, then the roots can’t breathe – with that lovely combo, our plants that we recommend for the miniature gardening die.

What I love to see on the potting soil bag is that it’s from a local company. If the garden center that you frequent are worth their salt, they’ll have a variety of soil products from companies in your area or thereabouts. If you don’t see it on the store shelf, ask for it. The request will get back to the manager/buyer and they’ll know customers are looking for a local choice.

Soil for miniature gardening or fairy gardening

How Much Soil Do I Need for My Miniature Garden Container?

Because some of our plants are really tiny, it is miniature gardening after all; you might be tempted to put the tiny plants in a big pot to let them grow in. This is called “swimming in soil” and the reason this will not work is that the water will not stay around the root ball where it is needed because there is too much soil in the pot. The water wicks to the bottom of the container, away from the plant’s roots and all is futile. A basic rule of thumb is any new plants need to transplant in pots that are 2” to 5” bigger or wider. If you’re planting a group of plants, take the total of all the pots combined.

This chart was taken from my Gardening in Miniature book that has all the garden basics you need to get started in the miniature garden hobby.

Soil chart for container gardening

From the bestselling Gardening in Miniature book.

Note that 1 cubic foot bag of soil or compost is about the size of regular pillow. There are about 25 quarts in 1 cubic foot. So, using the chart above, a pot that is 8 to 11 inches wide, will take almost half a bag, or half a cubic foot, to fill it up. Note that the depth of the container isn’t accounted for in this chart but, it should say “width and depth” of pot. But here’s an awesome soil calculator for you to bookmark here.

In-ground miniature gardening

Instead of removing the grass, we planted on top of it mainly because we found clay in all our garden beds. But I always found that by the time I cleared the patch of lawn, I didn’t have the energy to do any gardening so I was all for this easy way to prep a garden bed!

For In-ground Miniature Gardens

Use compost. That’s it. Soil is compost but will have many more nutrients in it than bagged topsoil. Just spread the compost on top of your soil each spring, and you are done!

If you are just starting an in-ground garden bed of any type, try our type of lasagna gardening. Lasagna gardening is really ‘composting in place’ but that means that you have to pay attention to the ratios, layers, timing and materials… (Oh gee, what’s for lunch?? :o)

BUT what Steve and I did with our new garden beds when we moved to our house in 2010 was incredibly easy and worked like a charm. We laid a long piece of rope down to outline the edges of the new garden bed. We covered the grass with heavy cardboard, piled as much compost on top as we could on top, cut in the edge of the garden bed and installed the border. Then planted the garden in the compost. Done.

We top it up each spring as much as we can. Now the garden bed has settled down to ground level but it works better for the miniature garden scene than a mound – the paths and patios stay level and the watering doesn’t mess everything up.

Got questions, compliments, concerns or complaints? Leave them below.

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Janit's Mini Garden Etsy Store

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Decorating Your Fairy Houses for the Holidays

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

Decorate more than just your full-sized house for the holiday! A project adapted from the Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book for a demonstration at the Plow and Hearth store in Marlon, NJ.

Decorating Your Fairy Houses for the Holidays

I took a couple of pages out of my Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book for a recent Plow and Hearth demonstration earlier this month at their Marlon, NJ store. It was fun getting messy while meeting several fairy gardeners that came to see what I was up to!

For this demo, I turned one of their fairy garden houses into A Very Fairy Christmas House with a little paint, glue and detailing that took about 2 1/2 hours to do. Needless to say, I could have crafted for another 2 1/2 hours!

This Fairy Christmas House project was adapted from the Fairy Haven project in the Prop Shop book. Check out the photos below for more ideas:


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

This is the fairy house that is in the Prop Shop book. What you can use is just about anything within a fairy’s reach. The Prop Shop book goes over multiple ways of attaching different items to the resin house. 


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

The same fairy house used in the Prop Shop book before the renovation. The end result will look nothing like the house you started with! 



Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

This was one of the first fairy houses that I customized. I always wanted a pink house and this is currently the only way I can have one. Lol!


ANNIVERSARY SALE! Get both books for $35 PLUS FREE SHIPPING! (Until 11/30/17)


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

The second fairy house I customized was for a Seaside Fairy Garden for client north of Seattle. This one was a fun one – I loved playing with one theme and pushing the boundaries of what I could do with it.


The Miniature Garden Society

A Private Community of Like-Minded Miniature Gardeners! Click the logo to learn more about this wonderful new adventure! 


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

If you use your customized house outside in your fairy garden where it can get weathered and aged, just plan on giving it an update every year or so. Everything weathers in the garden!


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

The Seaside Fairy House before the renovation photographed in our front miniature garden.


Find your Plow & Hearth Fairy Houses here.

Love miniature gardening? We do too! Join us and thousands of other miniature gardener for your FREE Mini Garden Gazette Newsletter delivered straight to your inbox each Friday! Sign up here.


Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Find the Fairy Haven renovation instructions inside the new Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book along with 36 more projects designed specifically for the miniature garden – written by a miniature gardener! 



Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Project Extension

A Very Fairy Christmas House! We are ready for the holidays! 

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Miniature Gardening on the East Coast!

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop Book

Gardening in Miniature Prop Shop book tour is on its way to the East Coast! 

Miniature Gardening on the East Coast!

Come one, come all! Come and play and laugh and get inspired! This is serious! Lol!

Hey, I’ll be at two different venues THIS weekend. Come and see my Plow & Hearth Very Fairy Christmas House Renovation to see what YOU can do with your fairy houses! I’ll be decorating the house for the holidays throughout Thursday evening, November 2nd, from 4pm to 7pm at the Plow & Hearth, Marlton, NJ, store. Be sure to print out the coupon below just in case you find something you like – they have a bunch of new miniatures this season. (Or keep it on your phone, I’m sure that works as well.)


AND I’m at the largest miniature show on the east coast, the Philadelphia Miniaturia show, note that Friday night is the preview night that requires a special ticket – here’s the details:

Philadelphia Miniaturia Show
Friday November 3rd through Sunday November 5th 2017

To be admitted on the 3rd, you must purchase a preview ticket for $25 (covers full weekend admission)
Preview hours are 6pm – 9pm Friday and 9am – 10am Saturday

General Admission – Show hours Saturday 10 – 5, Sunday 11 – 4. Daily admission $10 Adults, $4 Children under ten

Where: Crowne Plaza Hotel, Cherry Hill, NJ.


Can’t make either? Join us for your FREE Mini Garden Gazette each Friday (this Friday is an exception.) Sign up here.

Want to jump in and dig deeper? Check out our Miniature Garden Society Community Website here.

And for everything miniature garden and then some, check out our new website at


The Miniature Garden Society


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28 Miniature Garden Ideas for Halloween Decor DIY

Miniature Garden Ideas for Halloween

28 Miniature Garden Ideas for Halloween!

28 Miniature Garden Ideas for Halloween Decor DIY

If a picture is worth a thousand words, here are 28,000 of them right here in this new 28 Miniature Garden Ideas for Halloween Decor DIY video! Easy Halloween do-it-yourself decorations that you can make for your miniature garden, fairy garden or railroad garden. The crafting days are upon us so let the fun begin!

You’ll find a ton of more ideas on diy miniature accessories now up in the Miniature Garden Society, a private, community website dedicated to everything miniature garden!

See what is up in your Miniature Garden Center Store now!

Scared yet? Like this? Join us here for more fun in the Miniature Garden!

Miniature Garden Ideas

The Miniature Garden Society

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New Format for Your Mini Garden Gazette Newsletter & Video Letter About Miniature Topiary!

New Format for Your Mini Garden Gazette Newsletter: Video Letters!

They say a picture says a thousand words. I wonder how many words a video says? Lol! Join me and thousands of Fellow Miniature Gardeners for you weekly dose of miniature garden goodness via VIDEO! I’m only starting to scratch the surface on what I can show you!

Today’s video is all about creating topiary for the miniature garden. See it here.

These videos will only be through the Mini Garden Gazette newsletter (sign up here) and archived in The Miniature Garden Society where they will be added to and expanded upon as we move forward. This is still a brand new hobby so we are still assembling all the many delicious insights, how-to’s and to-do’s as we go. Join us here, for yourMini Garden Gazette Newsletter. Join us here forThe Miniature Garden Society where we are digging deeper and dreaming bigger!

Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center

The Miniature Garden Society

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How to Save Time and Money on Your Miniature Gardening


Layer it. The Jacqueline Hillier Dwarf Elm is a great anchor tree for the miniature garden bed – you can easily plant under it as it gets older. That is a miniature Blue Planet Spruce in the back, left side. Sedum Angelina to the right and miniature daisies on the right. The pond is handmade – the best kind!

How to Save Time and Money on Your Miniature Gardening

Do you want to save some time and money? 

Do you want to have a successful miniature garden next summer too?

Did you know you can have BOTH?

  • Fact: Fall is the best time to plant your garden bed.
  • Fact: You can save time and money next summer by planting your garden right now.
  • Fact: The success rate for getting trees established in the garden bed is far greater in the autumn months than any other time of year.

(Images are from our Instagram feed. Follow the leader for more fun in the miniature garden, I’m under @theminigardener!)


This miniature garden was sold around 2003 and lives on the Oregon coast. The couple who sought us out and bought it for their sister in law still keeps in touch with us. Apparently it is still alive and thriving. A testament to our true miniature garden trees, plants and shrubs!

Fall Planting Perks

Many people think spring is the best time to plant an in-ground miniature garden, but fall actually has many definite advantages. Fall planting is perfectly positioned in between the hot summer months and the cold winter season so any plant planted right now, will use this time to an advantage to get established in your garden bed. You can plant in-ground as long as the ground is not frozen.

You see, the plant’s roots still grow in temperatures 40° or above so, even though the temperatures might feel cool to you, the plant does not mind at all. During this time the root systems have a chance to develop and become established before winter. If you’re in a place where it doesn’t freeze, the roots will actually keep growing and establishing themselves to get ready for next spring.

When spring comes back, the new root system can fully support and take advantage of the flush of new growth. When the leaves start to bud and grow, the stronger roots are now able to tap in the reservoir of water on their own. You’ll save time because there is less maintenance to do, you’ll save money by lowering your water bill AND you will lose less plants to the whim of nature because they are already well-on-their way to becoming established. You can spend more time on creating and crafting the details of your miniature garden instead.


Blue-colored shadows underneath the Golden Sprite Hinoki Cypress that’s about 9″ tall now. Our true miniature and dwarf trees and shrubs grow up to look like a majestic tree – in miniature! Why do you think we keep using them in our gardens? Because they can stay in the small scale for years and years…

Tips for your fall planting:

  1. Always invest in the best plant material as possible. High-quality trees and shrubs come with a well-developed root system that is ready to grow. Don’t get fooled by bargain plant sales – many of those plants have been fertilized consistently over the last few months and will crash when you plant them in your yard because you have no idea on the level of feeding they are use too. Do you always wonder why you easily loose plants from plant sales ALL the time? This is it. Word.

For example, Steve and I invested in a couple of cherry trees a few years back. We got them on sale – and it was the end of the sale – so we compromised and chose the best two out of four on the lot. We brought them home and planted them in our new garden about five years ago.  Well, this winter I’m definitely pulling both of them. They didn’t branch out as I expected. They did not produce any cherries – oh wait, I think I got one (1) cherry last year. This year, no cherries at all – none, nada, zilch, zippo. I even tried to prune them each year to attempt the shape them and increase the cherry production with disastrous results. After five years of trying to compromise with these bargain-sale trees, we ended up with a big huge waste of time and money. Had we stepped up and invested in decent high-quality trees to begin with, I would have cherry jam on my pantry shelf, and I would be looking forward to another cherry blossom show next spring.


That’s a mugo pine on the left and a hemlock tree in the center. In the background on the right, is a wall of Monteray Cypress (a.k.a. Wilma, Goldcrest or Lemon Cypress, Cupressus macrocarpa ‘Wilma Goldcrest’)


2. High-quality trees and plants will reward you year after year by a behaving as they should. Take the time to find the best trees for your miniature gardening. Here are the questions that you need answers to in order to find the best plant for your gardens (- oh, and yes, we answer them right in each listing in our online store!)

  • How do they grow: what shape they will grow up to be?
  • How much will they grow per year?
  • What do they need to stay happy and healthy in your miniature garden?
  • What are the water needs?
  • Can it even grow in your area?

If you’re buying plants without answering these questions, you’re not taking advantage of our experience and expertise at our Miniature Garden Center, All of our customers can get hands-on advice specific to your planting needs – just for being our customer! 


From our Instagram feed. The miniature garden bed, full of texture and color, looks like a full-sized garden bed. How fun is that? The green lobe-shaped leaves are miniature daisies, about 1/2″ long.

Miniature Garden Plants is Our Specialty!


3. Buy from a nursery that has fresh plant stock each season.  Many of the copy-cat online nurseries that attempt to specialize in true miniature and dwarf trees get their plant stock once a year: IN THE SPRING. That’s why you will see plants on sale right now, because they are leftovers. You may be getting a great bargain – but it’s not – that plant has been sitting on their store shelf for the last six months, in the hot weather, getting completely stressed out and is definitely root bound by now. Our trees and shrubs, and because we ONLY focus on miniature gardening, are FRESH each and every season. We are able to order in small batches from our high-quality grower to keep our inventory at the highest quality for YOU, our Fellow Miniature Gardener.

A wee bud on a dwarf fir is getting ready to burst. If you only plant in the spring, you'll miss the show that these plants put on!

A wee bud on a dwarf fir is getting ready to burst. If you only plant in the spring, you’ll miss the show and have to wait for another full year before they do it again!

On top of saving time and money by planting this fall, here are more great reasons:

  •  You don’t have to wait a year for results, enjoy the spring flush IN the season! If you plant your miniature garden now, you can enjoy the spring flush of growth at its prime. The lime-green buds that emerge from the tips of the miniature spruces, hemlocks and firs are so soft and bright, you’ll giggle with delight. The buds (called candles) of the wee mugo pines magically flush out in tiny, softer growth, you’ll wonder how they do that.
  • You can witness the spring with the deciduous trees too, (deciduous = lose their leaves in the fall) as the little baby leaves quietly unfurl on the small branches. The spring flush of growth is often so magical, you can see the leaves growing. So if you wait and plant it in the spring, you’ll miss it – have you will to wait a full year before experiencing the awesomeness of spring in your miniature garden.
  • You can appreciate the winter’s blush for months. Many of the conifer’s foliage change color in the colder temperatures and will give you a colorful show to enjoy in the winter months when you need it most. The miniature and dwarf hinoki cypress change to a wide variety of colors, plum, amber, purple and orange. The cryptomerias blush purple as do the junipers. The arborvitae turn a wonderful, solid amber color that looks great in the gray of winter. If you plant now you can appreciate this colorful wonder of nature for the winter THIS year. 

Showtime! More winter bonuses by planting in the fall months: you get to see the entire cycle right now – no waiting another year to find out what you’ve missed! Above, the Pusch Dwarf Norway Spruce has cones from last year mixed with the new growth and emerging cones for a fantastic delightful experience.

So you don’t have to shut-down your miniature gardening just because winter is coming. You still have plenty of time to get your miniature garden or fairy garden ideas planted in the ground before it freezes.

See our plants by zone here.
See our plants by light here.

Remember that miniature gardening is, indeed, a season-less hobby because you can always, always, always plant a container garden at anytime of year.

More useful blogs:

Winterizing Your Miniature or Fairy Gardens
About getting your in-ground gardens ready for the winter.

Keep Gardening This Winter with Indoor Miniature Gardens
Includes dish gardening and terrarium information.

For the Love of Conifers: The Winter’s Blush
Dwarf and mini conifers change with the seasons too.

Winterizing Your Miniature Garden And Containers
A few tips on winterizing your containers from central Ontario – the land of icy tundra!

Like this? Well then join thousands of other like-minded miniature gardeners and sign up for the world’s ONLY regular miniature garden newsletter, The Mini Garden Gazette. It’s FREE and delivered straight to your inbox each Friday. Sign up here.

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