Waiting for Spring in the Miniature Garden

Bursting buds on a wee Canada Hemlock. Tsuga canadensis 'Loowit'

From the Archives, April, 2009: Bursting buds on a wee Canada Hemlock. Look to your miniature and dwarf conifers for proof that spring is finally here!

Waiting for Spring in the Miniature Garden.

I’ve got my fleece hoodie on, my wool socks and a hat – and I’m inside in my office. Did someone forget to order spring? I’m itching to get out in my garden and get growing! The only upside is that the plants don’t care and our spring flowers are pushing through the cold spring temperatures.

So, what to do? We need to appease our inner gardener. It’s spring. Here are some ideas to get you gardening.

 

The Miniature Garden Society - it's where craft and garden meet!

Rain is Good

It’s really not so bad. Don your rain gear and get out in it. With your “space-suit” on and an iPhone playing your favorite music or podcast, you instantly create your very own bubble and can have a lovely time getting some much-needed chores done. Want to make the world go away? This is how you do it. Lol!

TIPS:

  • Have a couple pairs of garden gloves handy so when one pair gets wet, you can change into dry ones, and keep going.
  • Don’t work the soil when it’s completely wet, you’ll damage all the microcosms and air-pockets in the soil and make mud.
  • You can always pull weeds and clean-up your walkways and driveway.
  • Prune your shrubby perennials. If your trees are still dormant and not showing any new buds at all, you can still prune. If you have any questions regarding any plants from our Miniature Garden Center store, email us.
  • You can clean out and organize the garden shed. There’s nothing like puttering in the garden shed or on your porch with the rain pattering on the roof.
  • Clean-up your containers – or let the rain do it. Put your empty pots out in the rain to get washed, and take a scrub brush to them if needed.

 

 

Divide and Share

This cold spring has given us a little more time to dig up and divide some of our perennials, if you haven’t already done so. Ground covers follow this general rule: the first year they sleep, the second year they creep and the third year they leap. By dividing your ground covers in your miniature garden every three years, they’ll stay in check.

TIPS:

  • Plant any extra divisions in different parts of the garden to create a more cohesive, overall design.
  • Watch out for the dormant plants that you can’t see yet! Refer to your photos from last summer so you don’t accidentally dig it up or bury it.
  • When you do replant, take care to mix up the foliage textures a bit. Contrast leaf textures and match or compliment the leaf-color. If all the foliage is the same size the garden bed, full-size and in miniature, will look too sketchy. By mixing-up small leaves with big leaves, and the conifer’s needles with the unusual foliage of a Hinoki cypress, for example, you’ll have professional looking garden design.
  • Share extra plants with your neighbors, make another miniature garden, or plant them up in pots to donate to a charity plant sale later in the season.
create-happy-moments2

More from the archives, April, 2009. I can lead a snail to water, but I’ve never seen him drink…!

Armchair Miniature Gardening

There is always virtual miniature gardening too! Here is a bunch of inspiration at your fingertips:

Like this? Join us and thousands of other like-minded miniature gardeners for your weekly Mini Garden Gazette. It’s free! Sign up here: TwoGreenThumbs.com

http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Advertisements

1 Comment »

  1. […] Here is a blog post to get you started despite the weather. Miniature Gardeners don’t need a reason or a season to start gardening! Waiting for Spring in the Miniature Garden. […]

    Like

RSS feed for comments on this post · TrackBack URI

Thoughts and Opinions:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: