New Miniature Garden Plants for Indoor or Outdoor

Miniature Garden in a trug

A miniature garden to go. Jervis Canada Hemlock on the left, Elf Dwarf Spruce in the middle and the Jacqueline Hillier Elm on the right. Note the cute little trunk of the Elf Dwarf Spruce.

New Miniature Garden Plants for Indoor or Outdoor

We have been working hard at restocking the store for the fall and holiday season with a ton of new miniature garden plants and accessories – and we’ve outdone ourselves this time. I think we’ve amassed the largest collection of miniature garden trees shrubs and plants for retail sale all in one place. Over 75 different trees, shrubs and bedding plants for your miniature gardening pleasure!

We also had a chance to source some different plant choices for different climates too. The Red Tip Podocarpus is a great plant of for the southeastern U.S.; the Mugo Pines are still perfect for northern climates with a hardiness of -50F. Brrrrr! But let’s run down a few more of the new and exciting plant additions this season.

 

Baby Boxwood for the Miniature Garden

Baby Boxwood plants from left to right: Justin Brouwers, Variegated and Suffruticosa. Slow growing plus a little trimming keeps them small in the miniature garden.

Baby Boxwood

We have two new boxwood trees, the Justin Brouwers and the Suffruticosa boxwood. As with all our boxwood that we use for miniature gardening, these plants are baby plants that you can keep trimmed small for your miniature garden. All varieties can be grown indoors with plenty of light and some direct sunlight. They like regular water, potting soil with no additives, and your container must have a drainage hole in the bottom – these plants do not like their roots wet.

The difference between the two: Justin Brouwers wears a darker green and smaller leaf and the growth habit is more upright or shrub-like. If left outside over the winter months, Justin Brouwers will hold its green color. The Suffruticosa’s leaf is a bit bigger and more rounded but the overall shape is similar to a young tree. If kept in full sun outdoors, it will turn that bronzy color in the winter.

Dwarf Spruces for the Miniature Garden

Dwarf Spruces for the Miniature Garden. The Elf Dwarf Spruce is the one on the cover of Gardening in Miniature

Tis the Season for Dwarf and Miniature Spruces

An accidental moment of cuteness has happened, we have nine different dwarf and miniature spruces all together at once. It’s like a family reunion without the bickering. Big and tall, round and small, we have one to suit almost every situation. Spruces are an outdoor plant but they can be brought in for up to 2 to 3 days to enjoy over the holidays here is a blog on how to do that properly and safely.

Gardening in Miniature book

The tree on the cover is an Elf Dwarf Spruce

As requested, we have stocked up on our cover-girl-tree this season, the Elf Dwarf Alberta Spruce. That is the tree on the front cover of the Gardening in Miniature book. We’ve had that little guy approximately 13 years by our calculations – they are 3 to 4 years old when we get them in from the grower. In a couple of years, you will wake up one fine morning and discover the cutest trunk lifting the wee canopy up off the ground and it just gets better with age.

For the holidays we have a trifecta of Alberta spruces here for your every need. The dwarf Alberta spruces, the ‘Pixie’ and the ‘Pixie Dust,’ are both miniature spruces with slower growth rates than the popular ‘Jean’s Dilly.’ The main difference is the ‘Pixie Dust’ gets a blush of creamy white tips in the middle of the summer that looks somewhat like pixie dust.

 

Dwarf Hinokis  for the Miniature Garden

New dwarf Hinokis for the miniature garden offer new colors, textures and shape.

Oh Hinokis!

We also have several new and exciting and Hinoki Cypress to offer. The new Thoweil Hinoki Cypress proves to provide a gorgeous wall of green-ness for the miniature garden. Look forward to this one growing up and out and provide an upright broad shape that can anchor the back of the miniature garden.

Two new little balls of green goodness have arrived as well. The ‘Ellie B.’ and the ‘Gnome’ Hinoki Cypress look the same when young but will grow up into two different shapes: the Ellie B. will grow upright into mounds of congested foliage, looking like a cloud, and the Gnome will stay globe-shaped and close to the ground.

New trees on standard for the miniature garden

New trees on standard for the miniature garden. Thyme Leaf Cotoneaster on the left, Streib’s Findling Cotoneaster on the right.

Cotoneaster = “Coh-tone-ee-ahs-ter”

And now that miniature garden is out of our backyards, in the mainstream and is practiced worldwide, our beloved local growers have caught up to us and are attempting to furnish our needs. If they would only ask us, huh? But we certainly can give them points for trying. The two plants that happen to be in question are both Cotoneasters on standard. Who’s up for trying one?

“On standard” usually means the plant has been grafted onto a long trunk. For these Cotoneasters, the grower has groomed the plant’s own trunk to be the standard, so you will see new growth along the stem throughout the year. Pinch off any new shoots that pop out when you see them to keep the trunk clean and the plant’s energy going to the top.

The Thyme Leaf Cotoneaster has really tiny leaves and the branches will grow up and out from the middle of the shrub. You can trim it into a ball, square, or any shape you like.

The Streib’s Findling Cotoneaster has larger leaves and will naturally cascade down. This will create an opportunity to trim it into umbrella-shaped canopy, which will be very charming in miniature, especially when it flowers in spring.

Both Cotoneasters will produce the cutest little white flowers in spring followed by red berries for the fall and winter months. I’m not sure you can go wrong with either one; we’re keeping a set for ourselves and looking forward to seeing them grow in the miniature garden.

Like this? Then you’ll love our Mini Garden Gazette. It’s free, fun and filled with miniature garden goodness. Join us here.

The Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest

Join us for The Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest – imagine the possibilities!

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