Posts Tagged condo gardening

Getting Ready for the Super Bowl of Garden Shows

nwfgs display preparation

Getting ready for the big Northwest Flower and Garden Show that starts next week. All balls are in the air as the display arises from the pre-chaos preparation.

Getting Ready for the Super Bowl of Garden Shows

It really is the Super Bowl for gardeners as the teams of people from all over the industry gather and descend upon downtown Seattle for one week only. Landscapers, independent garden center owners, garden designers, floral designers, growers, nurserymen, authors, clubs, associations and  – well, I probably missed a few people but you get the gist – they join forces to bring you a dose of spring in the middle of winter. If you haven’t been, go. It’s a treat for the senses when you need it most.

Here’s a sneak-peek of our big display for the Small Space Showcase at the fabulous Northwest Flower and Garden Show. It’s a special year for us – it will be our 10th year displaying and it’s the garden-show-debut of our bestselling Gardening In Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living Gardens book by Timber Press. We just couldn’t wait any longer to show you a little about what we’ve been up to!

nwfgs display preparation

Big, small, medium and tall. Our display in the Small Space Showcase is going to be all about miniature gardening this year, and jam-packed with only miniature gardens.

See our miniature pot selection here. You can “add sedums” if you need the plants for them if you like.

Find that wee miniature gnome here, up in the store. We stake him so he’ll stay put.

nwfgs display preparation

Something old, something new, something borrowed… no, we’re not getting remarried, it’s the NWFGS! Lol! This photo was from our very first miniature garden scene we made in 2001. An overloaded Scooter, ready for the road and parked in the garden, forces the viewer to create their own story.

Find out more about us and miniature gardening here, on our main website, www.twogreenthumbs.com

See the weird and wonderful miniature garden accessories here up in our Etsy Store.

See our regular line of plants and accessories here in our main, online store, Your Miniature Garden Center.

nwfgs display preparation

We try to include as many new techniques and ideas as we can – and some ol’ favorites too.

Find the adobe garden jar here. 

nwfgs display preparation

Many parts make up the whole. You just hope that you’ve thought of everything but you’ll only know what you’ve missed when you start to set it up at the Convention Center.

This is our 10th year doing this display, and we use this as a place to experiment with new ideas and new plants too. Above, a miniature podocarpus hedge makes a cute backdrop for a miniature vignette. (See the other nine garden displays here on our Flickr album.)

nwfgs display preparation

Our Mini Patio Mix Kit helps keep everything in place. It’s easy and very adaptable. Our formula remains true to scale too, with very fine sand that you can only find here the PNW.

Find the Mini Patio Mix Kit and a great selection of miniature garden patio materials here.

nwfgs display preparation

It’s easy to come up with a bunch of ideas for a display – the harder part is editing down what works, what will deliver the maximum value to the viewer, and, of course, what is the funnest.

nwfgs display preparation

The mess that a big display generates here in our studio is quite impressive. Once the parts and pieces are assembled at the Convention Center on Sunday/Monday – we can clean up, take stock and… breathe.

nwfgs display preparation

We keep our handmade miniature accessories from every year. You’ll be able to see them all in one place in this exhibit. It will be really sweet to see it when it’s done – stay tuned! 

2014 NWFGS Speaker Decal

Come and meet us! I’ll be in the University Bookstore’s booth #211 on Saturday, February 8th after 11 am. (Come early, I’m not sure how long we’ll be there.) AND I’ll be the Hood Room on Sunday, February 9th at 10:45 am talkin’ about miniature garden plants and trees – with lots of NEW eye candy! And here is more info on the garden show website. A book signing follows the talk.

See the Northwest Flower and Garden Show website here. Keep an eye on their Facebook page for a chance to win tickets to the show. 

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Gardening in Miniature book

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Happy Solstice in the Miniature Garden

Ad-Solstice 2013

Happy Solstice in the Miniature Garden

Part of our series, A Year in the Miniature Garden.

The winter solstice marks the shortest day of the year. Some celebrate with ceremony and ritual. Others mark the day quietly by lighting a candle and having a quiet moment of thanks.

For me? It’s the halfway point. It signals that it is all downhill from here for two reasons. First, the days will keep getting lighter longer and in good ol’ Seattle, it will soon be spring in the garden.

And second, I’m not much of a winter person and with my family 3000 miles away in Toronto, my holidays tend to be focused on working my retail stores. The normal last “safe” date for shipping for our online stores is usually the 21st.

Time to relax, heal and breathe.

Happy Solstice fellow MGs!

With love from Janit & Steve

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Here are the others in this series:

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden 

Halloween in the Miniature Garden

July 4th and Canada Day in the Miniature Garden 

Father’s Day in the Miniature Garden

A Birthday in the Miniature Garden

Mother’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Earth Day in the Miniature Garden

Spring [Easter] in the Miniature Garden

St. Patrick’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Valentine’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Like this? You’ll love our FREE monthly newsletter, The Mini Garden Gazette! Join us here.

Your Miniature Garden Center

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Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

Celebrating the Thanksgiving Harvest in the Miniature Garden

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden 

We are grateful to add this miniature garden to our series, A Year in the Miniature Garden. We’ve used this garden for all seasons, and changed the accessories to match the holiday or occasion. The others in this series are at the end of this blog, in case you missed them.

Today, we are serving up a couple of quick do-it-yourself projects so you can decorate your miniature garden for the day. Note that it is okay to pull-in a couple of Christmas accents if you need some sparkle and twinkle in your scene. Being Canadian, this hint has been slow to adapt, our Thanksgiving in October, a couple of weeks before Halloween.

Miniature Holiday Stakes

(Apologies for this being so late – the explanation is in the next diy. – J.)

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

You decorate your full-size garden with in-season plants like Chrysanthemums, ornamental squash, corn stalks and hay bales. In the miniature garden, your patio space is usually limited, so look for ideas that you can stake into the wee garden beds instead.

The following simple DIY can be made with buttons too. The variety of holiday and whimsical buttons have grown exponentially recently, if you haven’t been to a fabric store lately, go. To me, fabric stores are right up there on the list of other stores that specialize in craft supplies, art supplies, dollhouse stores, hardware and bookstores – I either want one of each, or to live there! Lol!

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

We found this Wood Necklace Kit at Michaels Crafts, along with the Maple Leaf Brads and Lollipop sticks.

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

The Maple Leaf Brads are just wrapped around the stick, with a drop of glue on the back to hold them in place.

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

Flip it over and glue the stake on the back with two-part epoxy if you can, some will need drilling. Shim the other end of the stick so the sticks dry straight – or tape it to stay in place while the glue dries.

Miniature Cornucopia

A wee horn of plenty, or cornucopia, is a standard harvest icon and a fun, quick DIY to do while you wait for the turkey. I assembled the first cornucopia for the Canadian Thanksgiving, then proceeded to forget where I found that miniature rope that I used. It was perfect! I couldn’t find any more! OMG! It was a miniature garden CRISIS! Lol!

Miniature Cornucopia Horn of Plenty Ideas

What to do with ½” scale gourds in a 1″ scale garden? Treat them as ornaments, of course! (That one took me a minute to figure out. I thought I ordered 1″ scale! Lol!)

Alas, not to worry. After a little stomping-of-the-foot-because-I-had-to-compromise, I tried regular burlap twine. It did look okay, but, I wanted a cleaner look. The yellow burlap twine looked finer after I separated the strands, but when it connected with the glue, it handled just like the brown twine. I resorted to painting cotton string to get the horn-look that I wanted.

The two burlap-twine-horns were coated in glue afterwards, to lock-in the strands and keep them neat and tidy. Now looking back, they look more natural than the one I made with the cotton string. We live. We learn.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

The left and top horns were made from a single strand of regular burlap twine. The one on the right is painted string, the bottom one is the perfect miniature rope – it must have been from a tag or leftover from a gift because I can’t find more of it. Click to enlarge.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

The next best thing is to make your own twine: Put a dollop of paint in a small container, add about a teaspoon of water and mix it together. Put the strand in the container, mix it with the paintbrush to coat it. Remove and place on rag, squeeze out excess and let dry. Rinse paintbrush off. 

You will need:

  •  1 yard of string
  • 3″ x 3″ paper from a paper bag, leaf or anything flexible and brown
  • white craft glue
  • paintbrush
  • tape
  • clip or 2 clothespins
  • scissors
  • brown paint (optional)
Miniature Cornucopia Horn of Plenty Ideas

Assemble ingredients.

Miniature Cornucopia Horn of Plenty Ideas

Make a cone out of the 3″ x 3″ paper. Brush glue on one side and glue together to complete the cone shape.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Don’t cut off the excess paper yet. You can use it to hold onto the project later.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Wad-up a cone from the leftover paper to stuff inside the cone. This will help keep the shape of the cone while you put the string on.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Generously brush on the glue about half-way down the cone.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Start gently, holding the end of the string in place as you make the first loop around the cone.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Squeeze together rows as you go.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Don’t pull too tightly. Keep the string rows together.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Finish the cone to the end. If you run out of string, unwrap and start further down on the cone. The glue will dry clear.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Cut it off completely now, or you can wait until the glue dries.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Tape the end to keep the string in place while the glue dries.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

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Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Use a clip that stands up or 2 clothespins to stand the horn up while it dries.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Add some greenery (sedum cuttings) or sparkle (gold beads) to make it more interesting.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Or fill it up with small seashells, seedpods (different sizes and shapes) and colored beads to represent the “plenty.”

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

Now the miniature cornucopia with the holiday stakes and decor easily deliver the message: Happy Thanksgiving!

Here are the others in this series:

July 4th and Canada Day in the Miniature Garden 

Father’s Day in the Miniature Garden

A Birthday in the Miniature Garden

Mother’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Earth Day in the Miniature Garden

Spring [Easter] in the Miniature Garden

St. Patrick’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Valentine’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Like this? You’ll love our FREE monthly newsletter, The Mini Garden Gazette! Join us here.

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

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Preparing for Winter in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Garden for Eastern Washington

This miniature garden went to Grandview, Washington this week. The clients wanted a garden for part shade, hardy, asymmetrical and with a pond. They loved it!

Preparing for Winter in the Miniature Garden

The most powerful miniature garden images come from gardens that have been growing and weaving together for years. A lot of miniature gardens that you see don’t adhere to the main garden principle: right plant, right place, and are often treated as temporary arrangements that will outgrow or die within the season.

If you have been disappointed in the results of your miniature gardens, there are easy ways to hone your skills so you can experience a successful and happy mini garden that can last for years. But first, you may want to spend a bit of time deciding where to grow your garden, then choose right plants to suit that area. Here’s a link to our 101 Series for you to browse through, refresh your memory and see what tips and techniques you can add to your arsenal.

Miniature Garden

The pot was about 24″ in diameter and a lovely bowl-shape. I cut the miniature brick sheets with kitchen scissors and pieced it together before locking it in with our Mini Patio Mix – invented by miniature gardeners and exclusively available from our online store here.

Working with the Seasons

One of the main questions is winter care, and this goes hand-in-hand with “right plant, right place.” Either you are planting a garden with cold-hardy plants that can stay outside all winter long OR you are using tender plants that can survive the indoor winter climate that you can move outside next summer. Only in the more temperate areas of the country can you leave your tender plants outside for the winter months.

Here is a mini-directory of previous blog posts to help you get the right information you need in order to grow a successful miniature garden.

Miniature Garden Landscape Tip

Don’t forget, the simplest garden ideas work in miniature too. Anchor the back of the garden with a boulder or two and let the ground cover grow around it.

Winterizing Your Miniature or Fairy Gardens
About getting your in-ground gardens ready for the winter.

Keep Gardening This Winter with Indoor Miniature Gardens
Includes dish gardening and terrarium information.

For the Love of Conifers: The Winter’s Blush
Dwarf and mini conifers change with the seasons too.

Winterizing Your Miniature Garden And Containers
A few tips on winterizing your containers from central Ontario – the land of icy tundra!

Like this? Then you will love our Mini Garden Gazette. It’s still free and we publish once a month. Here’s the link to join us, you’ll get a couple of emails at the very beginning, then you’re on the monthly cycle.

Miniature Garden Landscape Tip

Add a cute detail for the viewer to find when they get closer to the garden – then watch for the smiles and chuckles.

Miniature Gardening At Swanson's Nursery

Join us for an exclusive miniature accessory sale too! Click the picture to go to the Swanson’s event page for all the details. See you there!

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Easy, Quick & Fun: A Miniature Garden Pumpkin House

Halloween Miniature Garden

Once the pumpkin house was carved, it was easy fun setting up this shot in the miniature garden.

Easy, Quick & Fun: A Miniature Garden Pumpkin House

After years of creating and growing with this new-again hobby of miniature gardening, it’s a wonder that you can come up with anything new, huh? But, alas, it’s the variables that rope you in and keep the ideas dancing in your head in the wee hours of the morning. So many plants, pots, accessories, sizes, themes and designs to keep you creative!

What to do? – You can whip together a small 4″ pot for a great hostess gift, or plant a bigger garden in a tall pot to live by the front door to greet your visitors with.

You mean I can plant a garden now? – ‘Tis the season and you can start with Halloween, carry on through Thanksgiving and into the holidays with the same garden – or make a new one each month. Container and miniature gardening can be done anytime, anywhere, so don’t wait for the seasons to have a reason!

Halloween Miniature Garden

We tried shooting with some extra light off to the side, but found them a bit distracting from the pumpkin house. We found the light-up ghost for $1.99 at Rite Aid.

Shooting in the Dark:

- Set up your shot in the daylight and start shooting when it’s dusk. If it gets too dark, the camera can’t see the plants with the natural light and you can’t see the surroundings. Photoshopping it afterwards tends to look too contrived.

- Use a tripod or something sturdy to hold the camera in place. The camera’s shutter will need to stay open for a few seconds, by keeping the camera steady, it will stay focused.

- Try a couple of different settings on your camera. If you have automatic “scene” settings, try the food and/or museum settings first. Turn the flash off if the camera sets it off automatically. If you are tinkering with manual settings, try upping the exposure compensation to a brighter setting.

- Load your photos from your camera before you take the scene apart. Seeing the images on a bigger screen gives you another perspective and you can see what needs tweaking, fix it and reshoot it.

- Be prepared to work fast, as soon as that sun sets you have a limited amount of time to use that dwindling light. If you can, do it again the following night. If you’re an early bird, try this at dawn but set up the shot the day before when you can see, have the candles ready to light and have a piece of cardboard or plastic to sit, kneel or lay down on.

Halloween Miniature Garden

I cut the squares for windows, then sliced up the cast-off pieces to make the “window panes” and just wedged them in place. The pieces will dry out and shrink so either keep some extra pieces cold and damp to replace the strips when needed. If they dry out too much, get the hot glue gun to tack them in place from the inside. (Assuming the inside flesh of the pumpkin has dried out as well. Remember that it’s only temporary.)

Miniature Garden Clean-Up Tip: For your Halloween set-up, leave the fallen leaves scattered around the miniature garden. It will look more natural. Don’t worry about detailing the garden either, the focus will be whatever is lit up. In this example, the eye will go to the pumpkin house first, the ghost second, and then take in the rest of the scene.

Miniature Halloween pumpkin house

The impromptu patio was taken out of a miniature garden and reused here. It’s made from our Mini Patio Mix Kit, a special recipe just for miniature gardens. You can customize to fit any garden and won’t wash away in the rain. 

Have a happy and safe Halloween! 

In case you missed it:

How to Carve a Miniature Pumpkin

Halloween in the Miniature Garden

Our main website with galleries and FAQs

Our online store, The Miniature Garden Center

Like this? Then you’ll love our FREE Mini Garden Gazette! Join us here.

Miniature Garden Trees

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More About Indoor Miniature Gardening + Gallery

Indoor miniature gardening

Create this Indoor miniature garden as a centerpiece for the holidays at our Nov. 23rd workshop at Swansons Nursery, Seattle Wa. (Click the picture to get to the calendar for more workshop details.) This pot is about 12″ wide.

More About Indoor Miniature Gardening + Gallery

Don’t you just love this hobby? The seasons changing can only mean another miniature garden and now you can make one for the indoors! Do you want a wee beachy-garden scene to get you through the cold months? Or, create a miniature gratitude garden for Thanksgiving? Let’s recap what you need to know, and then follow with a few examples of the different indoor miniature gardens we’ve grown over the years.

Ten Golden Rules are from The Houseplant Expert, Dr. D. G. Hessayon, my favorite go-to book for indoor plants and a great reference for your bookshelf. Here’s a quick summary of his top 10 adapted for miniature gardening.

1. Don’t drown them. Roots need air as well as water. Let the soil dry out until barely damp. Put your finger down into the soil about 1” deep to test and yes, your finger is still the best way.

2. Give them a rest. Plants need less water and feeding in the winter. Some plants may not look as good, or need cutting back, before the new growth signals their return. Be patient and follow the plant’s signals.

3. Accept the loss of “temporary” plants. Some plants are not meant to live more than a season or two. Some miniature gardeners treat outdoor plants as short-lived houseplants during the winter. The Jean’s Dilly Dwarf Spruce, or the Pixie or Pixie Dust, is often used this way because they are true miniature Christmas trees.

4. Give them extra humidity. The average houseplant needs more humidity in the winter as the forced-air heat dries out the air quite quickly. By misting or grouping your houseplants around your miniature garden, you can maintain a better level of moisture in the air around the plants.

5. Treat trouble promptly. With Google at our fingertips, there is really no reason not to be able to identify a plant-problem quickly and easily. State the problem plainly; name the plant and search under Google Images to find it faster. For example, “brown spots on parlor palm leaves.” Search at least two or three sites to get a better perspective of the solution. Not everyone is an expert out on the Internet, most often the most simple and natural solution is best.

6. Know when to repot. When the plants start to look sickly, then it may be time to repot. Look for the roots growing out of the bottom drainage holes to know when.

7. Choose wisely. Right plant, right place. You can’t grow a sun-loving plant in a dark corner nor can you grow a shade-loving plant in front of a sunny, southern window.

Recommended Tools:

  • Water can with a long, narrow spout to get the water through to the bottom of the plants. Get used to how it pours before using indoors or you’ll make a big mess the first time.
  • Mister – but know which plants like more, which like less.
  • Saucers AND protective pads with plastic on one side, felt on the other. Don’t trust any pot or saucer on your good wood surfaces. Use an extra moisture-barrier-pad recommended for plants with a plastic backing to avoid wicking. I’ve seen cork mats, but I’m not sure if they wick moisture or not.
  • Organic fertilizer. Avoid chemical fertilizers of any kind, the plants just don’t care for it and it builds up in the soil.
  • Soft sponge for cleanup.
  • Old kitchen spoon for repotting and fork for raking.
  • Scissors or small garden shears – or both.
  • indoor Potting Soil – Use potting soil without any extra fertilizers or moisture-retaining polymers. Look for an organic, indoor potting mix for a general-purpose soil that will be okay for most of your houseplants. Succulents, cacti and African Violets need more drainage material, like vermiculite or perlite.

You will notice that there is not a lot of variety yet in the plants that are shown here. That is because I killed the rest of them. Yep. I tend to kill indoor plants a lot better than our outdoor plants. The plants shown here are some of the tougher plants I have found for gardening in miniature. For the most part, I’ve included the plant’s names, and the growing notes under each photo.

Indoor miniature tropical garden

A Parlor Palm and Norfolk Pine anchor the garden, filled in with miniature Aloe and Hawarthias as the understory. The Pine was left in its original poly pot to help keep the roots damper than the other plants. The lagoon-shaped pond adds to the theme. (“Janit Calvo’s Lagoon Pond” is now discontinued.) This pot is about 22″ in diameter.

Indoor miniature gardening

One of our all-time most popular plants, the English Variegated Boxwood stands alone to make a simple gratitude garden for a sunny spot. This pot is about 8″ wide.

More About Indoor Miniature Gardening + Gallery

A baby Parlor Palm on the left and a Kingsville Dwarf Boxwood on the right. This miniature mediation gardens need regular water and bright light. This pot is about 8″ wide.

More About Indoor Miniature Gardening + Gallery

The tree in the back is the Variegated English Boxwood, to the right is Dwarf Mondo Grass, a small-leafed succulent with an elusive name ;o), in the foreground, two Kingsville Boxwood shrubs. Needs regular water with bright light. Sedum cuttings in the urns will last a few months before needing replacing. Large size or one-inch scale accessories. This pot is about 20″ across.

More About Indoor Miniature Gardening + Gallery

The same garden as above, but with medium size, half-inch scale accessories and gravel mulch in the garden beds. You can see how the smaller accessories are swimming in such a large pot, but also notice how big they make the whole garden appear.

Indoor Miniature Gardening

A custom-made miniature garden planter from England. Elwood Cypresses on the each end, Dwarf Mondo Grass behind the urn, sedum cutting in the urn, a small boxwood shrub to the right of the bench and baby tears as the “ground cover.” (Get in touch with me if you want more info about this handmade planter.) This garden needs bright, indirect light and a very cautious watering schedule as this box has no drainage holes. This container is 21″ wide by 9″ deep.

Indoor Miniature Gardening

A finished project from my book, Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living World. Clockwise from the tall Elwood, to the left is a Sugar Vine (Cissus striata,) Baby Tears and a Variegated English Boxwood. Bright light with regular watering, the Sugar Vine will need cutting back every year to slow it down. This pot is about 12″ wide.

Indoor miniature garden

A simple Fairy Vine and a handmade trellis is the perfect place for an daily empowering message. The “boulder” anchors the garden and makes it look established. This pot is about 7″ across.

Indoor miniature mediation gardening

Our Complete Indoor / Outdoor Miniature Garden Kit has our three most-durable indoor plants, from left to right: the Dwarf Mondo Grass, Variegated English Boxwood and Baby Tears. The Kit includes the stone, Mini Patio Mix and different accessories. This pot is about 10″ across.

Indoor miniature gardening

An impromptu miniature garden centerpiece for Halloween that I made a few years ago. It lasted about three weeks before it turned to mush. I would try this again with a taller pumpkin – the candle burnt the top of the “greenhouse.” The pumpkin was about 10″ in diameter.

SEE more of our plants that we recommend for indoor miniature gardening here.

Like this? Then you’ll love our Mini Garden Gazette! A FREE monthly newsletter filled with news, tips, how-to’s, seasonal to-do’s, and exclusive offers. Join us and thousands of other miniature gardeners from around the world here.

Gardening in Miniature book

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Indoor and Outdoor Container Ideas for Miniature Gardening

Miniature Garden Houseboat

We made this wood box to hold this house boat idea of pine and stained in on the outside but, as all wood does outside, it will rot slowly. If you want your miniature garden to last, our favorite recommendation it still high-fired pottery, available at your local garden center.

Indoor and Outdoor Container Ideas for Miniature Gardening

We’ve corralled all the blogs about the containers that we use for miniature gardening all in one place this week. There are so many different ways to garden in miniature, and so many different containers to use in the marketplace, this summary will help guide you in choosing the right container for your next miniature garden. But before you start, decide where the miniature garden will live when it’s done, and then you can narrow down your size, color, shape and material.

About investing in the right container.
A miniature garden can stay together for years, choose a container that you will want to live with – for years.

Miniature Gardening in Recycled Containers, Part I
Planting in suitcases, drawers, wheelbarrows, metal water cans, anything metal, wood crates and trugs

Miniature Gardening in Recycled Containers, Part II
Planting in shoes, boots, broken pots, pumpkins, teacups, bowls and dishes.

How to plant a miniature garden in a big pot, part I
Tips and info on how to plant in deep pots.

How to plant a miniature garden in a big pot, part II
What to do before you begin. About water control plus tips for moving large containers.

Keep gardening this winter with indoor miniature gardens.
About indoor miniature gardens, dish gardens, open terrariums. How to make a mini scene with a “full-size” houseplant pot.

How to winterize your miniature garden containers
Tips on how to protect your outdoor containers through the winter.

Your local, independent garden center will have the best selection for all your container garden ideas. Follow their recommendation for durability and overwintering. Avoid the big-box garden departments for your pot-shopping, their staff is usually inexperienced with what works over time.

In our new book, Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living World, we explore the different kinds of pots, where they are most useful, and how the pot can help get your theme across to the viewer. The book is quickly becoming the bible for miniature gardening if you haven’t got your copy yet. Here’s a link to read the customer reviews and editorial reviews on Amazon.com.

Miniature Garden under snow

If you like to watch the miniature garden age and grow together, invest in a pot that will last.

Miniature Garden Group #2

All shapes, sizes, colors and materials, the pot choices are endless. START by choosing where the garden will live, then you can narrow down the size, color and shape to look for.

Like this? Then you’ll love our Mini Garden Gazette! Our FREE monthly newsletter on everything miniature garden. Join us here.

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