Posts Tagged condo gardening

New Miniature Garden Trees for the New Hobby, Part I

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

After a couple/few years of letting this Dwarf Wisteria tree grow in, I can prune it back next winter and still have a good-looking tree. The accessories here on one-inch scale. Click the picture to get to the store.

New Miniature Garden Trees for the New Hobby, Part I

Ahhh, summertime is just around the corner! A new season always brings new reasons to the miniature garden workbench: parties, barbecues, gardening, relaxing, enjoying, making fun and creating. Want to lower your blood pressure? Start a miniature garden. Want to escape from the every day? Create a miniature garden. Want to help clean the air around you? Grow a miniature garden. Want to make someone happy? Give a miniature garden. With a combination like that, miniature gardening could get very, very contagious. And we’ve only just begun.

So, with a new season, we bring new plants for your miniature gardening pleasure. Here are the newest trees to our inventory, three of which we have been selling for a while, (but we wanted to make sure they would work out before officially introducing them,) and the other four are promising candidates recommended by our grower. This is part one of two blogs on our new trees that are now in stock.

Miniature Garden Plants

Our Dwarf Wisteria, about three years after we planted it. The pot didn’t make it through last winter, but the tree did. This is one of the photos from the Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living World, by Timber Press.

Dwarf Wisteria

I thought I might have killed it – again. But my Dwarf Wisteria (Millettia japonica ‘Hime fuji’) bounced back and looks as pretty as ever. I’ve left it to grow-in naturally to see what it does and I haven’t been disappointed. Mine turned into what I call a small country-garden tree, or a tall, leggy shrub that you can plant something in front of to hide the trunk.

It’s not a dwarf version of the real wisteria apparently, but it looks like one. Do note that it does not flower. Keep it in a sunny spot but don’t let the soil dry out. Trim the wayward branches back to maintain its bushiness. Gradually trim off the bottom growth/branches if you want more of a tree look. This gem can be moved inside for the winter if you are in one of the colder regions of the country, otherwise its hardy to 10F, (or about 35F if in a container,) cold zones 8 – 10, heat zones 10 – 7.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

The Seiju Dwarf Lacebark Elm is already a great looking miniature garden tree. Shear the canopy in winter and clear away any new growth along the bottom of the trunk when you see it. Shown here in a 4″ pot, they stand about 7″ tall right now. 

Seiju Dwarf Lacebark Elm

Charmed, I’m sure! We love this new Seiju Dwarf Lacebark Elm (Ulmus parvifolia ‘Seiju’) for it’s perfectly in scale trunk and tiny leaves. It’s a common tree for bonsai so we know it will work well in the miniature garden. The leaves will drop in the fall and leave an interesting framework as the stems develop an exfoliating bark, as they get older.

Trim wayward branches, it should promote more bushiness too. It prefers full to part sun, and moist, well-drained soil. It matures slowly, about 3” per year to 4 feet tall; you can slow this down even further by trimming it back in late winter. Keep the foliage pruned away from the trunk to keep the tree’s shape. Hardy to -20F (or -5F if in a container,) cold hardy zones 5 – 9, heat zones 9 – 5.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

The crimson-red flowers on the Bullata Japanese Spirea are set off by the deep, slight bluish-green leaves, a lovely combination.

Bullata Japanese Spirea

A little shrublet for the miniature garden AND it flowers too. The Bullata Japanese Spirea (Spiraea japonica Bullata’) offers a deep green,

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

The one in the middle is just finishing its first flush of flowers, the two on the left and the right are coming into their second flush. A great miniature plant without the flowers too.

broadleaf with clusters of rose-crimson flowers that flush out in late spring. This will be a very pretty compliment to the miniature and dwarf conifers in your miniature or fairy garden.

This spiraea (pronounced spy-REE-ah) is slow-growing at 2 to 4” per year, but for the miniature garden, shear this little bush back about one third each winter to help keep it small for years. Great for a full sun spot with soil that can remain damp. I think it can tolerate a little dryness, but never leave it too long in between watering sessions. Shear it after flowers in the spring and you’ll get a second bloom out of it. Hardy to -30F (or -15F if in a container,) cold zones 7 – 9. Heat zones 9 – 1.

Zoned Out

Don’t know your zone? The USDA developed a general cold zone map. And the American Horticultural Society developed a heat zone map for the other half of the country. Put the two together if you are in the southern states, and be sure to double-check to see if the plant you want is the correct heat-zone rating. Right plant, right place – but you may be surprised with a little experimentation too.

USDA Cold Zone Map is here.

AHS Heat Zone Map is here.

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Gardening in Miniature book

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Miniature Gardening in the Southeastern States

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

I was hired to do a talk and demo for three days so I took the opportunity to make three different gardens. The silver shrub is a Blue Star Juniper. The burgundy bush is the Helmond Pillar Barberry matched with Red Thyme. Perfect for an eastern or cool sun spot.

Miniature Gardening in the Southeastern States

When you start looking for the plants that will suit miniature gardening, you’ll find a new world of plants will open up to you. The same thing happened when I was asked to do a talk at the wonderful Epcot Flower and Garden Festival at Disney World. Southeastern climates with extreme heat and humidity will need plants that can withstand those conditions if you want them to thrive. I started my search with my short-list of ways to find plants for miniature gardening, consulted my library and found that some of our plants that we’ve been working with for years will work too. Here are the results.

What’s a Miniature Garden Plant?

Not everyone knows what a “miniature garden plant” is yet, and some nurseries are mixing up the fairy garden idea with miniature gardening. Just because it has a “fairy” name, doesn’t mean it will work as a miniature. And, just because it has small leaves, doesn’t mean it will suit either. Here, on the other hand, is what will work if you focus on the right combination of small leaves, slow growth rate and the height of the plant and its flowers. Note that what I mean by the height will depend upon whether you are using that plant as a tree, shrub or bedding plant – and that includes flowers too. Look for small-leafed and slow growing: – Rockery plants – Miniature and dwarf plants, (‘miniature’ and ‘dwarf’ are growth rates) – Alpine plants – Baby plants – Ground covers

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

For this set-up, I anchored the bed with a Top Point Dwarf White Cedar, (the tall tree,) the round shrub is a Red Tip Podocarpus and matched with Dwarf Mondo Grass and a Fairy Vine. A good combo for cool sun or part sun with regular water.

Tips for growing Two Green Thumbs’ trees in southern climates:

A lot of the trees that you buy in 4” pots for miniature gardening are little balls of young foliage. In cooler climates the air helps keep the plant at a comfortable temperature if you keep the conifer dieback cleaned out of the center where it tends to collect in the young shrub. In more humid climes, you can help the young shrubs get air circulation into the wee canopy by “opening them up.” With a little patience and a sharp pair of garden scissors, carefully prune out the middle branches on the shrub. Work gradually and always take the entire plant into consideration before each snip. Cutting the wrong branch or a “big” branch can compromise the overall look of the shrub. Start with cutting away any criss-crossing branches, snip any downward branches and then concentrate on shape. Plant in part shade or part sun to avoid that strong afternoon sun. Many of our plants can handle the full sun in northern climates where the sun is a bit cooler, and the ground stays evenly damp. You can mimic these conditions by giving the plant a cooler spot to grow in with cooler sun, eastern sun, dappled light or on the northern side of the house. Don’t over plant. Our tendency is to fill up the garden right away to get that look of a “real” garden – and that’s one of the joys of gardening in miniature: instant gratification. But, in some southern regions where there is a lot of humidity, the trees will appreciate any extra air circulation that they can get. So not only help the tree/shrub with a little pruning, plant the plants further apart so the air can go through the plants to keep them healthy.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

The combination can handle a little bit more sun. The yellow shrub is a Limeglow Juniper, paired with a Teeny Mugo Pine and an Elfin Thyme for the lowest layer.

Rethink your plant selections. You can always change your thinking and consider the miniature and dwarf conifers as annual plants that will last for a couple/few months. Hinoki Cypress or any dwarf Spruce can certainly be enjoyed over the holiday months until they start to fade. Don’t’ think of the initial cost of the tree as an expense, but rather as entertainment, and amortize the cost over the 4 to 6 months that you can enjoy your miniature garden – I bet it’s cheaper than a latte! And, it’s easy to replace too – swapping out a miniature garden tree for a fresh one takes minutes – and you can still go to work on Monday morning a brag about all the gardening you got done on the weekend. Here is a list of miniature garden plants that we stock in our online store that don’t mind the heat and humidity of the southeastern garden. Note that not all plants are not available at all times and there may be some trail and error needed in finding out what they need to be happy. Red Tip Podocarpus – Podocarpus aplinus ‘Red Tip’ Blue Star Juniper – Juniperus squamata ‘Blue Star’ Groundcover Juniper – Juniper horizontalis Tansu Japanese Cedar – Cryptomeria japonica ‘Tansu’ Ulmus parvifolia ‘Hokkaido’ – Dwarf Chinese Elm Dwarf Mondo Grass – Ophiopogon japonica Nana Fairy Vines – Muhlenbeckia complexa Lily Turf – Lirope spicata Sedums – small leafed I’m posting from Disney World and I’m not able to link these plants to the store – yet. ;-) I’ll show the results of the demos on our next blog so stay tuned! The books I consulted in my library, in addition to our bestselling Gardening in Miniature Book: Create Your Own Tiny Living World: Succulent Container Gardens, by Debra Lee Baldwin, published by Timber Press Miniature Garden Guidebook for Beautiful Rock Gardens, Container Plantings, Bonsai, Garden Railways, by Nancy Norris Like this? Then you’ll love our Mini Garden Gazette newsletter. It’s FREE and you get a free PDF just for signing up with us! Join us here. Your Miniature Garden Center   http://www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

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Gardening in Miniature at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

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Gardening in Miniature at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show

It is our Two Green Thumbs’ 10th anniversary display at the country’s best garden show, the Northwest Flower and Garden Show this year! We decided to give you a better peek into what we do, so we modeled the display after our studio and it contains as many miniature gardens as we could logically fit in – we actually had to bring some back home! Lol! Miniature gardens of all ages, shapes and sizes demonstrate the many things you can do with this idea – and they all start with “fun.”

I’ll be in the Hood Room on Sunday at 10:45 am with a slide-show and talk about ideal miniature garden plants and how to get started in the hobby. See you there!

You can find all the plants, parts and pieces at www.TwoGreenThumbs.com

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

We have indoor, outdoor, 10 year old miniature garden trees and new trees less than 3 years old.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

The inside of the studio – not entirely unlike our studio at home – but a lot tidier. ;o)

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Miniature gardening is an amalgamation of several different hobbies, craft and art forms. The many variables can keep a crafty gardener entertained for years.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

The shelves in our “real” studio tend to develop into a collection of miniatures, raw materials, samples and local artwork too. That mosaic pot in the center is by a friend from our Fremont Market days, over 10 years ago.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Steve made the ceramic camper. That dinosaur was a toy that I rusted. I found the clothespin-chair at a thrift-shop and superman reminds me to be strong every day.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Lil’ Valentine’s Day garden has a tiny Jean’s Dilly Dwarf Spruce and a Tsukomo hinoki cypress on the left. That’s a Butter Ball hinoki cypress with lacy foliage in the 2″ pot in front-right.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Tiny gardens all lined up on the shelf. This size is perfect for cheering somebody up, or just for a laugh. They make great hostess and thank you gifts too.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Baby date palms are great tropical trees in miniature – they take awhile to grow up so we have a few years to enjoy them in the miniature garden while they do.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

An Emerald Green Hebe on the left beside the sculpture, a Majestic Japanese Holly tree on the right with Dwarf Mondo Grass in front of it.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

A tiny Nana Lutea hinoki cypress keeps the deciduous Golden Torch Barberry company while it begins to bud – one the prettiest time of year for barberries.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

What to do with your overgrown miniature garden? Go with it! This little tree-hut is made from a block of wood attached to stilts to look like a secret getaway.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

12th Man Represents!! We are very proud of our Seattle Seahawks. They were the laughing stock of the NFL after the draft-picks they chose last year – no one thought they could win the Super Bowl Championship – but they did with hard work, faith and focus. Go Hawks!

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Jervis Canada hemlock grows slowly from a shrub to a grand miniature garden tree – just plant it in the right place, water it regularly, and trim off some of the foliage and bottom branches.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Jean Iseli Dwarf Hinoki does the same: it grows from a darling little shrub to a substantial miniature garden tree with very little effort.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

An older date palm on the left makes a great match for a Norfolk Island pine behind it on the right and a Haworthia in front of it beside the ramp. Can you feel that tropical island breeze?

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

Another Jervis Canada Hemlock that has grown into a perfect miniature garden tree.

Miniature gardening at the NWFGS

See this display on the skybridge at the Northwest Flower and Garden Show at the Seattle Convention Center – it’s on until February 8th. See you there! 

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2014 NWFGS Speaker Decal

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Getting Ready for the Super Bowl of Garden Shows

nwfgs display preparation

Getting ready for the big Northwest Flower and Garden Show that starts next week. All balls are in the air as the display arises from the pre-chaos preparation.

Getting Ready for the Super Bowl of Garden Shows

It really is the Super Bowl for gardeners as the teams of people from all over the industry gather and descend upon downtown Seattle for one week only. Landscapers, independent garden center owners, garden designers, floral designers, growers, nurserymen, authors, clubs, associations and  – well, I probably missed a few people but you get the gist – they join forces to bring you a dose of spring in the middle of winter. If you haven’t been, go. It’s a treat for the senses when you need it most.

Here’s a sneak-peek of our big display for the Small Space Showcase at the fabulous Northwest Flower and Garden Show. It’s a special year for us – it will be our 10th year displaying and it’s the garden-show-debut of our bestselling Gardening In Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living Gardens book by Timber Press. We just couldn’t wait any longer to show you a little about what we’ve been up to!

nwfgs display preparation

Big, small, medium and tall. Our display in the Small Space Showcase is going to be all about miniature gardening this year, and jam-packed with only miniature gardens.

See our miniature pot selection here. You can “add sedums” if you need the plants for them if you like.

Find that wee miniature gnome here, up in the store. We stake him so he’ll stay put.

nwfgs display preparation

Something old, something new, something borrowed… no, we’re not getting remarried, it’s the NWFGS! Lol! This photo was from our very first miniature garden scene we made in 2001. An overloaded Scooter, ready for the road and parked in the garden, forces the viewer to create their own story.

Find out more about us and miniature gardening here, on our main website, www.twogreenthumbs.com

See the weird and wonderful miniature garden accessories here up in our Etsy Store.

See our regular line of plants and accessories here in our main, online store, Your Miniature Garden Center.

nwfgs display preparation

We try to include as many new techniques and ideas as we can – and some ol’ favorites too.

Find the adobe garden jar here. 

nwfgs display preparation

Many parts make up the whole. You just hope that you’ve thought of everything but you’ll only know what you’ve missed when you start to set it up at the Convention Center.

This is our 10th year doing this display, and we use this as a place to experiment with new ideas and new plants too. Above, a miniature podocarpus hedge makes a cute backdrop for a miniature vignette. (See the other nine garden displays here on our Flickr album.)

nwfgs display preparation

Our Mini Patio Mix Kit helps keep everything in place. It’s easy and very adaptable. Our formula remains true to scale too, with very fine sand that you can only find here the PNW.

Find the Mini Patio Mix Kit and a great selection of miniature garden patio materials here.

nwfgs display preparation

It’s easy to come up with a bunch of ideas for a display – the harder part is editing down what works, what will deliver the maximum value to the viewer, and, of course, what is the funnest.

nwfgs display preparation

The mess that a big display generates here in our studio is quite impressive. Once the parts and pieces are assembled at the Convention Center on Sunday/Monday – we can clean up, take stock and… breathe.

nwfgs display preparation

We keep our handmade miniature accessories from every year. You’ll be able to see them all in one place in this exhibit. It will be really sweet to see it when it’s done – stay tuned! 

2014 NWFGS Speaker Decal

Come and meet us! I’ll be in the University Bookstore’s booth #211 on Saturday, February 8th after 11 am. (Come early, I’m not sure how long we’ll be there.) AND I’ll be the Hood Room on Sunday, February 9th at 10:45 am talkin’ about miniature garden plants and trees – with lots of NEW eye candy! And here is more info on the garden show website. A book signing follows the talk.

See the Northwest Flower and Garden Show website here. Keep an eye on their Facebook page for a chance to win tickets to the show. 

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Gardening in Miniature book

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Happy Solstice in the Miniature Garden

Great Gifts for the Gardener

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Happy Solstice in the Miniature Garden

Part of our series, A Year in the Miniature Garden. Give the gift that can last a lifetime: the joy of miniature gardening!

The winter solstice marks the shortest day of the year. Some celebrate with ceremony and ritual. Others mark the day quietly by lighting a candle and having a quiet moment of thanks.

For me? It’s the halfway point. It signals that it is all downhill from here for two reasons. First, the days will keep getting lighter longer and in good ol’ Seattle, it will soon be spring in the garden.

And second, I’m not much of a winter person and with my family 3000 miles away in Toronto, my holidays tend to be focused on working my retail stores. The normal last “safe” date for shipping for our online stores is usually the 21st.

Time to relax, heal and breathe.

Happy Solstice fellow MGs!

With love from Janit & Steve

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Here are the others in this series:

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden 

Halloween in the Miniature Garden

July 4th and Canada Day in the Miniature Garden 

Father’s Day in the Miniature Garden

A Birthday in the Miniature Garden

Mother’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Earth Day in the Miniature Garden

Spring [Easter] in the Miniature Garden

St. Patrick’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Valentine’s Day in the Miniature Garden

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Your Miniature Garden Center

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Thanksgiving DIY For the Miniature Garden

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Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

Celebrating the Thanksgiving Harvest in the Miniature Garden

Thanksgiving DIY for the Miniature Garden 

We are grateful to add this miniature garden to our series, A Year in the Miniature Garden. We’ve used this garden for all seasons, and changed the accessories to match the holiday or occasion. The others in this series are at the end of this blog, in case you missed them.

Today, we are serving up a couple of quick do-it-yourself projects so you can decorate your miniature garden for the day. Note that it is okay to pull-in a couple of Christmas accents if you need some sparkle and twinkle in your scene. Being Canadian, this hint has been slow to adapt, our Thanksgiving in October, a couple of weeks before Halloween.

Miniature Holiday Stakes

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

You decorate your full-size garden with in-season plants like Chrysanthemums, ornamental squash, corn stalks and hay bales. In the miniature garden, your patio space is usually limited, so look for ideas that you can stake into the wee garden beds instead.

The following simple DIY can be made with buttons too. The variety of holiday and whimsical buttons have grown exponentially recently, if you haven’t been to a fabric store lately, go. To me, fabric stores are right up there on the list of other stores that specialize in craft supplies, art supplies, dollhouse stores, hardware and bookstores – I either want one of each, or to live there! Lol!

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

We found this Wood Necklace Kit at Michaels Crafts, along with the Maple Leaf Brads and Lollipop sticks.

Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

The Maple Leaf Brads are just wrapped around the stick, with a drop of glue on the back to hold them in place.

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Miniature Garden Holiday Thanksgiving Stakes

Flip it over and glue the stake on the back with two-part epoxy if you can, some will need drilling. Shim the other end of the stick so the sticks dry straight – or tape it to stay in place while the glue dries.

Miniature Cornucopia

A wee horn of plenty, or cornucopia, is a standard harvest icon and a fun, quick DIY to do while you wait for the turkey. I assembled the first cornucopia for the Canadian Thanksgiving, then proceeded to forget where I found that miniature rope that I used. It was perfect! I couldn’t find any more! OMG! It was a miniature garden CRISIS! Lol!

Miniature Cornucopia Horn of Plenty Ideas

What to do with ½” scale gourds in a 1″ scale garden? Treat them as ornaments, of course! (That one took me a minute to figure out. I thought I ordered 1″ scale! Lol!)

Alas, not to worry. After a little stomping-of-the-foot-because-I-had-to-compromise, I tried regular burlap twine. It did look okay, but, I wanted a cleaner look. The yellow burlap twine looked finer after I separated the strands, but when it connected with the glue, it handled just like the brown twine. I resorted to painting cotton string to get the horn-look that I wanted.

The two burlap-twine-horns were coated in glue afterwards, to lock-in the strands and keep them neat and tidy. Now looking back, they look more natural than the one I made with the cotton string. We live. We learn.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

The left and top horns were made from a single strand of regular burlap twine. The one on the right is painted string, the bottom one is the perfect miniature rope – it must have been from a tag or leftover from a gift because I can’t find more of it. Click to enlarge.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

The next best thing is to make your own twine: Put a dollop of paint in a small container, add about a teaspoon of water and mix it together. Put the strand in the container, mix it with the paintbrush to coat it. Remove and place on rag, squeeze out excess and let dry. Rinse paintbrush off.

You will need:

  •  1 yard of string
  • 3″ x 3″ paper from a paper bag, leaf or anything flexible and brown
  • white craft glue
  • paintbrush
  • tape
  • clip or 2 clothespins
  • scissors
  • brown paint (optional)
Miniature Cornucopia Horn of Plenty Ideas

Assemble ingredients.

Miniature Cornucopia Horn of Plenty Ideas

Make a cone out of the 3″ x 3″ paper. Brush glue on one side and glue together to complete the cone shape.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Don’t cut off the excess paper yet. You can use it to hold onto the project later.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Wad-up a cone from the leftover paper to stuff inside the cone. This will help keep the shape of the cone while you put the string on.

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Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Generously brush on the glue about half-way down the cone.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Start gently, holding the end of the string in place as you make the first loop around the cone.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Squeeze together rows as you go.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Don’t pull too tightly. Keep the string rows together.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Finish the cone to the end. If you run out of string, unwrap and start further down on the cone. The glue will dry clear.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Cut it off completely now, or you can wait until the glue dries.

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Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Tape the end to keep the string in place while the glue dries.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

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Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Use a clip that stands up or 2 clothespins to stand the horn up while it dries.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Add some greenery (sedum cuttings) or sparkle (gold beads) to make it more interesting.

Miniature Cornucopia How-To

Or fill it up with small seashells, seedpods (different sizes and shapes) and colored beads to represent the “plenty.”

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

Now the miniature cornucopia with the holiday stakes and decor easily deliver the message: Happy Thanksgiving!

Here are the others in this series:

July 4th and Canada Day in the Miniature Garden 

Father’s Day in the Miniature Garden

A Birthday in the Miniature Garden

Mother’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Earth Day in the Miniature Garden

Spring [Easter] in the Miniature Garden

St. Patrick’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Valentine’s Day in the Miniature Garden

Like this? You’ll love our FREE monthly newsletter, The Mini Garden Gazette! Join us here.

Thanksgiving in the Miniature Garden

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Preparing for Winter in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Garden for Eastern Washington

This miniature garden went to Grandview, Washington this week. The clients wanted a garden for part shade, hardy, asymmetrical and with a pond. They loved it!

Preparing for Winter in the Miniature Garden

The most powerful miniature garden images come from gardens that have been growing and weaving together for years. A lot of miniature gardens that you see don’t adhere to the main garden principle: right plant, right place, and are often treated as temporary arrangements that will outgrow or die within the season.

If you have been disappointed in the results of your miniature gardens, there are easy ways to hone your skills so you can experience a successful and happy mini garden that can last for years. But first, you may want to spend a bit of time deciding where to grow your garden, then choose right plants to suit that area. Here’s a link to our 101 Series for you to browse through, refresh your memory and see what tips and techniques you can add to your arsenal.

Miniature Garden

The pot was about 24″ in diameter and a lovely bowl-shape. I cut the miniature brick sheets with kitchen scissors and pieced it together before locking it in with our Mini Patio Mix – invented by miniature gardeners and exclusively available from our online store here.

Working with the Seasons

One of the main questions is winter care, and this goes hand-in-hand with “right plant, right place.” Either you are planting a garden with cold-hardy plants that can stay outside all winter long OR you are using tender plants that can survive the indoor winter climate that you can move outside next summer. Only in the more temperate areas of the country can you leave your tender plants outside for the winter months.

Here is a mini-directory of previous blog posts to help you get the right information you need in order to grow a successful miniature garden.

Miniature Garden Landscape Tip

Don’t forget, the simplest garden ideas work in miniature too. Anchor the back of the garden with a boulder or two and let the ground cover grow around it.

Winterizing Your Miniature or Fairy Gardens
About getting your in-ground gardens ready for the winter.

Keep Gardening This Winter with Indoor Miniature Gardens
Includes dish gardening and terrarium information.

For the Love of Conifers: The Winter’s Blush
Dwarf and mini conifers change with the seasons too.

Winterizing Your Miniature Garden And Containers
A few tips on winterizing your containers from central Ontario – the land of icy tundra!

Like this? Then you will love our Mini Garden Gazette. It’s still free and we publish once a month. Here’s the link to join us, you’ll get a couple of emails at the very beginning, then you’re on the monthly cycle.

Miniature Garden Landscape Tip

Add a cute detail for the viewer to find when they get closer to the garden – then watch for the smiles and chuckles.

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