Working with Mini and Fairy Houses in the Miniature Garden

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

Working with Plow & Hearth’s miniature garden houses today. We’ve worked their Fairy Garden Cottage with Turret into an already existing miniature garden layout here and found that it can add another level of curiosity and enchantment.

Working with Mini and Fairy Houses in the Miniature Garden

Working a tiny house into your miniature garden design can add another dimension to an already existing layout. Once the viewer sees the tiny house, the story starts to evolve and curiosity starts to bubble and perk as the questions begin: Whose house is that? What’s going on inside? I wonder if I can I see inside? Houses and buildings are especially effective with young children because their ability to suspend realism is very endearing, as well as the house being big enough not to get broken or lost in the garden bed.

So, with a little help from Plow & Hearth today, we have a few houses to play with in various ways in our miniature gardens here at our studio. It is interesting to note that the few rules that do apply to miniature gardening apply to using miniature houses too. We found that it is still the combination of plants, patio and accessories with the house, that come together to create that “Aaawwww!” moment that delights and enchants instantly. Let’s take a look at the photos to see what works and what doesn’t.

[Click on the photos to enlarge them.]

In the photograph above, we fit the house underneath the canopy of a Jacqueline Hillier Elm, top-left corner, next to small Shimpaku Juniper shrub to the left of the house, you see the tiny trunk. The tall column of the Sky Pencil Japanese Holly to the right of the house works as an anchor point and helps to put the building into perspective for us. The patio and furniture helps deliver the scale.

The bottom layer is filled with small-leafed Sedums and ground covers to cinch the garden beds and to nestle-in the accessories. I resisted the urge to clean-up the shot and left the fallen leaves and debris alone. Note that the simple things, like a log or a boulder, can add a sense of permanence to the scene.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

The same house, simplified. If you took away one element, the plants, the patio or the chair, the scene would look incomplete.

Here, we’ve used the same house in a different part of the garden – it’s Plow & Hearth’s Miniature Fairy Garden Cottage with Turret. The fine-foliage of the beautiful Tansu Japanese Cedar canopy on the right helps to put the house in scale, the smaller Balsam Fir and ground cover Red Thyme finish the simple scene on the left. If we didn’t have the patio and chair to complete the idea, the house would look a bit lost. This patio is made from rolled marble pebbles and tumbled glass pieces and laid-in by hand with our Mini Patio Mix Kit.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

I think there needs to be something else going on, like a birdbath or patio furniture. The house seems a bit lonely. Lol! 

When photographing the houses, we found more mystery by photographing the scene from behind a taller tree or full-sized plant. That is a Pixie Dwarf Spruce on the right and another Balsam Fir on the left. The big trunk behind the house is a full-size Alpine Fir. The patio was made from our stone sheets and locked-in with our Mini Patio Mix Kit. This is Plow & Hearth’s Resin Thatched Fairy Cottage.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

Fitting a scene in an already existing garden still needed a bit of help to look right.

It was very fun to walk around the garden and see where the house looked its best but, funnily enough, we had to go back to our main components to get the look that we wanted. The patio and pathway situated the house enough to make it look like it belonged there and the smaller plantings brought the scale down to match the house. Here, in this photo, there were a couple of miniature garden trees and trees to work with: that amber-colored shrub to the left is a small heather and then to the left of that is a Pixie Dwarf Spruce help layer the full-size plants down to miniature.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

I couldn’t resist pairing the house with the reds and pinks of that Rose Glow Barberry behind it.

Now you can start to see how the smaller plantings around the house make it work. Now I want to live there. This is the Plow & Hearth Miniature Stucco Fairy GArden Cottage with Thatched Roof.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

The ground covers in this part of the garden were planted about 4 years ago. You can see how fun it is to left them grow and weave together. I’ll have to get in there next spring and weed out the New Zealand Brass Buttons (the mini fern-like plant) as it is fairly invasive.

Just a little patio is all you need – pardon the pun – this one was made from marble pieces, an ivory stone sheet and our Mini Patio Mix. The Plow & Hearth Adirondack chairs are an invitation to come on in and sit down. The stumps are staked to hold in place in the garden soil. Again, the rocks add a sense of permanence. Find the miniature garden ground covers up the our online store here.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

Have fun tucking some miniature details here and there to pique the viewers curiosity and force them to come in for a closer look.

Sedum cuttings in the wee pots make the perfect miniature container plants. Now you can see how aggressive that New Zealand Brass Buttons is but it grows on runners, so you can easily shovel-prune it or pull up the runners by hand. But boy does it look sweet.

Plow & Hearth carries the best book on Miniature Gardening too, if I may add. See Gardening in Minature: How to Create Your Own Tiny Living World up in their store here.

Like this? Then you’ll love our Mini Garden Gazette newsletter. It’s free and its once a month. You get a free PDF upon signing up too. Join us here.

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New Miniature Garden Trees are for Bonsai and Railroad Gardening Too

Miniature Garden Trees and Shrubs

White Bud Mugo Pine is a favorite for the miniature garden. This one has been groomed for a bonsai start but we can take advantage of that, and use it as a “big” miniature garden pine tree.

New Miniature Garden Trees for Bonsai and Railroad Gardening Too!

The fall shipment of miniature garden trees arrived this week and, as usual, I was chomping at the bit for the truck to arrive. I think it’s seeing them all at once that does it. The miniature and dwarf conifers come in an astounding number of colors, textures and personalities that is simply inspiring.

If you haven’t considered a conifer or dwarf tree for you miniature or fairy garden, please do. It will change the look of your miniature garden dramatically and make it look like a true garden in miniature. See our full line of miniature garden trees and plants here, there is something for almost every zone too.

New “Pre-Bonsai” Trees

In addition to our favorite miniature garden trees and shrubs we received a bunch of pre-bonsai plants too. While they are groomed to be bonsai’d, we know that we can use them in our miniature gardens as perfect “big” mini trees, trust that growth rate will be stable, and skip all the maintenance that comes with the art of bonsai. You can impress your friends AND your neighbors!

Keep them in shape by removing any new growth along the trunk and prune away any wayward top branches.

Click the photos to see more pictures and the growing details up in the store.

Shimpaku Chinese Juniper

Miniature Garden Trees and Shrubs

The Shimpaku Juniper before grooming and growing for a couple of years.

Pre-bonsai trees for miniature gardening

This Shimpaku Juniper after grooming and growing-in for 3 or 4 years. You can see why it’s prized by bonsai artists and desired by railroad gardeners. The peeling bark on the trunk adds wonderful detailing, they are hardy and drought tolerant too.

Valley Cushion Mugo Pine

Miniature and Dwarf Trees and Shrubs for the Miniature Gardeni

The Valley Cushion Mugo Pine is available as a cute little shrub too.

Miniature and Dwarf Trees and Shrubs for the Miniature Gardeni

A bigger Valley Cushion Mugo Pine groomed and grown in for about 3 or 4 years. It’s just too sweet to watch the wee trunk gradually lift the canopy off the ground.

Seiju Dwarf Lacebark Elm

Miniature Garden Trees and Shrubs

Before growing and grooming. You can see how delicate the trunk looks. If you start with young trees, you can have the pleasure of watching them grow up.

Miniature Garden Trees and Shrubs

The Seiju Lacebark Elm groomed for a few years by the grower. Maintain this look by pruning away any new growth along the trunk, and cut any wayward, top branches. In late winter, shear the canopy into shape by looking at the tree as a whole, instead of the individual branches.

See all the new trees and plants that arrived up in the store here. We’ve sorted them for you by zone here.

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Janit’s Laboratories, Ink.

Janit Calvo:

A Reblog and an update on a whimsical product idea – only from your Two Green Thumbs Miniature Garden Center. We’ve since sold hundreds of these little charmers:

Originally posted on The Mini Garden Guru - Your Miniature Garden Source:

Experimenting with Miniature Moss Terrariums. It takes about two hours to rejuvenate the moss from a completely dried state.

Experimenting with Miniature Moss Terrariums. It takes about two hours to rejuvenate the moss from a completely dried state.

Janit’s Laboratories, Ink.

REBLOG from Stardate: September 23, 2009.

I often feel like a mad scientist. Trying out completely different things that just might work together.

In art college, one of my final thesis projects (1996) was an interactive, computer controlled kinetic painting. I applied electronics and motors to painted panels mounted on a larger board. I had help designing a software program to turn the motors in either direction, randomly. All the panels were activated by a digital platform to turn it on for random amounts of time. The idea was to give each viewer a completely different experience of the painting.

I know, whacky. The painting department didn’t like the electronics, and the electronic department didn’t care for the painting aspect. I knew I was truly onto something, blending two…

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A Little Miniature Gardening in the Big State of Texas

Miniature Gardening in Texas

Most conifers and young plants found in four-inch pots can be enjoyed in the miniature garden for years before they get too big. That is a Blue Star Juniper on the left, and the base of a Compress Juniper to the right of the bench – both would do well in the Houston climate.

A Little Miniature Gardening in the Big State of Texas

I was invited to do an interview for Your Livable Garden, the nation’s longest running landscape architecture radio show based in Houston, Texas. Everything is bigger in Texas and that includes miniature gardening – pardon the oxymoron. It remains in our top fives States for our online store sales and our Mini Garden Gazette sign-ups, and it has been for years.

So, it was about time to go digging deeper into what miniature garden plants would grow well in the area. Aside from the usual fall-back-plants for hot climates: sedums, cacti and carnivorous plants – all of which can lend interest to a miniature garden design – I wanted to find a better list of plants that can actually look like miniature versions of full-sized trees to help cinch the realism. And where’s there’s a will, there is a way.

Miniature Gardening in Texas

This is what the Blue Star Juniper looks like when found in found in four-inch pots.

How Did You Do That?

How did I find some ideas of what plants would work in Texas from my desk in Seattle? I first looked at a variety of trees and plants on a few websites and some on Pinterest (focusing only on specific boards titled “Plants for Houston.”) I looked for the similarities or varieties of the same plants that we have been growing with success for years in our miniature gardens here in Seattle. Once I saw a tree or ground cover that I recognized, I looked it up to make sure it fit into USDA Zone 9 and the AHS Heat Zone 9 – focusing on the Houston area where the show was based. The decisions came easy, it was either they matched or not.

Microclimates are Your Friends

The second place I looked was to my Fellow Miniature Gardeners. I looked up what plants my customers from Texas were ordering, double-checked some of the zones, and found out that some of these gals are pushing the zones – which really meant microclimates. Yay, more trees to choose from!

Microclimates are areas in your garden that differ from the regional zone that you are in. For example, if the Houston area is in USDA Zone 9, but your eastern side of your house is shaded by a big tree, you may have a microclimate that could be in Zone 8. That big tree will make air make the air cooler and the soil damper, allowing you to push your zone to accommodate more plants. Awnings, structures, denser trees or shrubs, or a big planter can create different microclimates in your garden, and help plants that need a little more protection from that harsh Texas summer sun. (Here is more information on the Texas’ microclimates from a gardener in San Antonio.)

 

Miniature Gardening in Texas

Baby boxwoods can be enjoyed while they are young. Pruning it back yearly can help slow down the growth rate and keep its bushy shape. This is the Justin Brouwers Boxwood.

And the Results are In!

Bedding-Plants for USDA Zone 9

(Note that I may be off on the flowering times.)

Vinca minor – Can get aggressive. Trim ruthlessly or let it run behind your garden scene. Flowers in late spring, early summer.

Ajuga reptens – Can get aggressive in-ground but we have had terrific results in containers by trimming back the spring growth. Purple flowers in the summer. We like the ‘Chocolate Chip’ variety.

Liriope spicata – This Dwarf Lily Turf can grow tall in-ground after a few years, and spread somewhat fast. We have found it stays shorter in pots where the spreading can be controlled. There are other kinds of Liriope, look for the clumping kind, it’s better behaved.

Bellium minuta – Miniature Daisies are just the greatest. (We’ll have more in the store next week.)

Miniature Hostas – Love the shade. The miniatures are the cutest ever. Easy to grow. (The only reason we don’t grow them here in Seattle is the snails and slugs love them too.)

Groundcover Thymes – Different than the culinary Thyme and not edible. A pleasure to grow in the minature garden. Flowers in the summer.

Dwarf Mondo Grass – Another favorite. Good for indoors too.

Miniature Garden Trees and Shrubs for UDSA Zone 9

I used the botanical latin names because there are a number of varieties within each of these recommendations that will suit:

Euonymous japonicus microphylla – Look for the babies in four-inch pots as the shrubs can get really big. Start small can keep it small with yearly pruning to help slow-down the growth-rate.

Buxus microphylla – The English Boxwood is another favorite. As with the Euonymous, look for the young babies in four-inch pots and prune them to slow them down. See our selection of dwarf Boxwoods here.

Spirea japonica – Japanese Spireas are available in many different leaf-colors. Start with baby plants in four-inch pots and shear them by third after bloom and again in late winter. (Note that there is a gap in my spirea knowledge – I’m not sure what Spireas do in the winter in Texas. I need a teleporter. Lol!)

Juniper horizontalis & squamata – The Juniper horizontalis is the ground cover juniper that grows sideways. Great in-ground or in pots, just trim the runners (new growth) every spring and winter to slow them down. The Juniper squamata ‘Blue Star,’ for example, is a favorite with a mounding growth habit that can be shaped into a tree. See our miniature and dwarf Junipers here.

Miniature Gardening in Texas

The Juniper horizontalis, or ground cover Junipers, comes in many forms and colors. It really is a delight to grow.

You can start to see a pattern here with choosing young or baby trees with small leaves. If you can find them in four-inch pots, you can enjoy them for years in a miniature garden while watching it grow up. When it gets too big, you can start a “bigger” miniature garden, pass it on to another gardener or use it as in your full-sized garden bed.

And lastly, this is a sampling that other Texans have ordered from our online store where they must have microclimates. All of the plants listed below will need consistently damp soil (as in wrung-sponge-damp) and shade from that hot afternoon sun. Or, try them in containers that you can easily move around as the weather changes but, double-check to be sure that you can push the zones in your garden first.

- Dwarf and Miniature Hinoki Cypress

- Dwarf and Miniature Canada Hemlocks

- Dwarf and Miniature Spruce

- Jacquelline Hillier Elm (Available in Spring)

(The above list is based on the orders from our clients in Texas.)

Got a microclimate in your garden? See all of our “Zone 8 and Up” plants for miniature gardening here.

See all of our plants for all zones here.

We are just stocking up the online store this week and next to to get ready for the fall planting season! Want to be on the inside of the hobby? Join us for your FREE monthly Mini Garden Gazette newsletter. Sign up by using the form here.

Miniature Gardening with Janit Calvo

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Miniature Gardening News From Around the World

Flower Show Miniature Settings Photo

Prime Minister of Singapore, Lee Hsien Loong, is caught taking photos of Dr. K’s miniature garden exhibit at the Singapore Garden Festival. Yay!! Photo from Louise Krasniewicz of the Flower Show Miniature Settings blog.

Miniature Gardening News From Around the World

Geez, I take a week-off from blogging and miniature gardening goes on a world tour. Lol! Just in case you missed what’s been happening in the ever-growing world of The Little Hobby That Could, it’s making some serious headway throughout the world. Here is your update!

But First, Clarification for the Masses

But first, let us define our terms. Two things that stand out as I read the comments coming in from the general public, is that (1) miniature gardening is bonsai and (2) it is nothing new.

While bonsai is a form of gardening in miniature, this new way to garden is about just that – a garden. Bonsai means “tray-plant” (bon = tray, sai = plant) and its focus is on growing miniature versions of trees in shallow, tray-like pots. Bonsai really is an art form that requires diligence, patience and constant maintenance.

Miniature gardeners design with living plants and trees that mimic full-size plants, grow slowly and are planted as a garden in regular containers, or right in the ground. We adhere to the main garden rule, “right plant, right place” to minimize the maintenance so the garden is able to grow and weave together naturally. Most mini gardens are able to stay together for years before needing any repotting and the root-pruning is minimal, if it is needed at all.

Old fashioned miniature garden style

I used to make these a lot when I did the farmer, garden and craft markets. I called them “Old Fashioned Miniature Gardens” – it was the kind of garden your Grandma used to make. Nowadays it would be called a Fairy Garden. The blooming plant is an Armeria, or Pink Sea Thrift that is pulled apart into small starts. Photo Janit Calvo

And no, miniature gardening in not new – it’s just new to the marketplace and to most people, plus it needed some serious updating which is why I picked up the torch and ran with it. The one thing I discovered while selling my miniature gardens for years at farmers markets and trade shows, is that people have been miniature gardening and fairy gardening for decades. It was such a personal hobby, and there was no where to share it until social media linked everyone together, so it went unnoticed until recently.

From The Gardens by the Bay website.

I’ve been captivate by these since seeing them on Instagram last year. The Singapore Garden Festival was held at the Gardens by the Bay where you’ll find these wonderful sculptures called the Supertree Grove. It must be amazing to see! Click the photo to visit the site. Photo from GardensByTheBay.com.

Singapore Garden Festival Finds Miniature Gardening Fits the Bill

A delegation of miniature gardeners from the Philadelphia Flower Show’s Miniature Settings were invited to the Singapore Garden Festival to show, tell and teach about miniature gardening. Vice chair of the exhibit in PA, Louise Krasniewicz, was accompanied by Deb Mackie and Nancy Grube, all three are award-caliber miniaturists. Dr. K. (aka Louise) chronicled their journey on her Miniature Flower Show Settings Blog. It starts here and you’ll find links to the other exhibit and workshop posts further down on the page.

The Huffington Post Tries a Little Gardening

The Huffington Post did a little miniature gardening last week and posted a series of different gardens found on the popular Hometalk website. The headline boasted fairy gardens but, alas, there was nary a fairy in sight in the photos they choose – temporary arrangements, terrariums and my twee garden ideas were included. Please feel free to like, repost, comment and share. Thank you, Huffington Post!

The Daily Mail Online Gets On Trend

The Daily Mail is a popular website from the UK. They highlighted a series of my photographs this week for all to see! The only thing – I wish they spelled my name right. Lol! See the gallery here. Please feel free to like, repost, comment and share. Thank you, Daily Mail!

And Houston? We Have a Contact in India!

If you’ve been following me for a while, you’ll recognize these gardens as the winners of the international segment of our Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest last year. (The winners start here.) They are now up and running with their own website, (its a work-in-progress so check back!) and you can keep in touch with them on Facebook here.  

Who knew such a little garden could have so much impact?

Visit our online store for all the right plants, parts and pieces here.

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Tried, Trusted and True: Miniature Garden Accessories, Part 1

Miniature Garden Accessories, The Thinker

We’ve given a lot of thought behind what we offer through our online store.

Trusted, Tried and True: Miniature Garden Accessories, Part 1

I’m a tree-hugger. With just about everything I do, see, hear or read, I try to think about the environment and impact our decisions make upon the earth. Yea, sometimes that makes me the rain on the parade but if “it” is permanent landfill after it is done with, someone needs to speak up. (Not sold on global warming? Meet National Geographic.)

When I started to develop this idea, I could foresee what would happen to all the little furniture and accessories left out in the miniature garden and didn’t want my beloved hobby to generate garbage. Throughout this journey, I tried to choose the miniature garden accessories that work well in the outside and that would last in the elements and/or can be renewed with ease. Shopping for accessories quickly became an easy two-step decision: Would we see this in our full-sized gardens? Will it weather well?

In this day and age, it should be a no-brainer to make things that last. Even our resin pond designs that we had manufactured for us a couple of years ago didn’t work too well in the elements. They were beautiful when they came out of the box, but the colors quickly faded and/or changed color when left out in the sun. They became something I wasn’t proud to offer.

This is the beginning of a series that I’ve been thinking a lot about now that I have accessories that are over 14 years old. In my book, Gardening in Miniature: Create Your Own Tiny Living World, I step through a number of different kinds of materials that age and weather well, but we’re going further and deeper to give you the knowledge and skills to keep most accessories in your garden and out of your garbage.

Funny thing, it was our new puppy that brought everything to the forefront – literally. Lol! She eventually found all the miniatures that were in our gardens and brought them to us one at a time. Some of them I hadn’t seen for a long time, others, she gave her chomp of approval to before handing it over. So, here are the first accessories, some that we have been carrying since we began, that are tested, tried, true, renewable – and that we are confident they will hold up for years in your miniature garden too.

Faux-concrete figures age extremely well in the elements

Faux-concrete figures age extremely well in the elements. We been staking them to stay in place since day one – which has become an industry standard, thankfully.

Miniature Garden Statuary

The miniature garden statuary department is one of my favorite sections of our online store. All of our tiny figures are staked on a rod to stay in place in the soil so you won’t lose them – this has become the industry standard, thankfully. Our faux-stone figures can be added to just about any miniature garden and cinch the scale for the viewer for that “ah-ha!” moment because the figures are perfectly detailed and are true replicas in miniature, instead of a cartoon-type versions that don’t look real. More on renewing resin figures to come.

Miniature cedar trellises are perfect for the miniature garden.

Miniature cedar trellises age like cedar does: gracefully. The reddish tones turn to silver – still perfect for cinching the realism.

Miniature Cedar Accessories

We were thrilled to find someone in the USA to make these authentic miniature cedar trellises and decks. They age perfectly like all cedar does. The stakes help to keep the trellis out of the damp soil so it don’t rot. The bottoms of the cedar deck act the same, and remain free of rot for years despite being “on the ground.” Copy-cat versions on the marketplace today are resin and don’t hit the realistic mark at all, and are even worse after the color fades within one season. If you want your miniature garden to look authentic, buy accessories made of authentic materials.

Custom painted miniature garden accessories.

Painted metal miniature accessories can always be painted again. Make sure what you buy can be renewed easily to avoid disappointment – and garbage.

Painted White Metal Accessories

The beauty of the painted metal furniture and arbors is that when it does start to rust – as most types of metal will do when left outside – it looks even more authentic because it tends to rust in the same spots as in “real-life.” A thorough spray of paint can also work wonders making the metal wicker look like new again. It’s a good opportunity to keep your miniature garden scene updated with the current color trends. We’ll cover the best techniques in this series too.

Stay tuned for the how-tos by following this blog or join us for your FREE Mini Garden Gazette monthly newsletter here.

Find all our miniature garden accessories, plants and patio materials up on our online store here.

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Get Ready Now for the Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest!

Miniature Garden Contest Winner

Glenna’s miniature garden from the 2012 contest captivated our imagination with the different garden levels and the wee pond.

Get Ready Now for the Great Annual Miniature Garden Contest!

We’re moving the contest!!

Come one, come all and prepare for the great annual miniature garden contest! We are rearranging things this year and we’re moving the contest to next February. Holding the contest during the busy Holidays was just too confusing and chaotic for everyone involved, so we’re moving it to one of the other winter months when there is less happening. February, the month of love, sounded much more appropriate!

TAKE YOUR PHOTOS NOW AND START TO COLLECT THEM WHILE YOUR GARDEN IS LOOKING GOOD. See here for some pointers on photographing your miniature garden. Lights! Camera! Action! Photographing Your Miniature Garden.

Personally, I’m waiting until the fall to photograph my new miniature garden, not only has our zucchini infiltrated the fairy bed, but we left the volunteer sunflowers to grow haphazardly throughout the bed too. Ugh. What was I thinkin’??

Miniature Garden Contest Winner

Lori captured the Best in Show last year with her in-scale trees and plants.

Criteria to Enter:

- As we get closer to the date, we’ll finalize the prize packages and our special discount just for entering.

- All North American submissions must have a minimum of three items or plants from TwoGreenThumbs.com, our only sponsor for the contest.

- International Fellow Miniature Gardeners are welcome!

- The contest is held via Facebook, you can join us here.

- You must be a Fellow Miniature Gardener on our email list, sign up using the form here.

- It must be a living garden, no artificial plants are allowed.

- You can submit as many photos as you like, but you can only win once.

- We must have a minimum of 25 entries, from at least 5 different miniature gardeners.

NEW! Only Four Categories to Keep it Simple:

- First Place/Best of Show

- Second Place

- Third Place

- Best International

Miniature Garden Contest Winner

Dori romanced us with this sweet miniature garden scene. She even shrunk a “Gardening in Miniature” book down for the table. It’s hard to be objective when our Fellow MGs are so clever and crafty! Lol!

CALL FOR JUDGES!

If you are in the business of miniature gardening we would love to have you join us to help judge the gardens. You see, after many years of serving our Fellow MGs, so many of them have become friends and we are not able to be objective any more. We have a point system and a list of criteria to make it simple and straight-forward – in fact, it’s quite fun to do!

Let us know if you would like to be one of the judges and we’ll introduce you to our fan base, highlight your business on this blog, on our Facebook page, Twitter, Instagram, and create other fun ways we think of to celebrate your help in the meantime. Please note that you won’t be able to enter a photo for the contest if you are a judge.

Now, don’t just sit there! See how your miniature garden is growing! ;o)

Gardening in Miniature by Janit Calvo

Click the picture to get your autographed copy from our online store. Or Amazon[dot]com has it too!

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